Volume 12 Issue 337
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 31-Dec-2010 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 1-Jan-2011






Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© RAmEx Ars Medica,Inc.
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Early prion detection may be possible

Researchers have developed a method for detecting prions that may lead to a practical test for diagnosing the fatal brain conditions caused by these infectious agents. more  

Tainted products marketed as dietary supplements

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has tekan new steps aimed to keep consumers safe from harmful products that are marketed as dietary supplements and that contain undeclared or deceptively labeled ingredients. FDA has found that these products are often promoted for weight loss, sexual enhancement, and bodybuilding. more

Consistent exercise associated with lower risk of colon cancer death

Consistent exercise is associated with a lower risk of dying from colon cancer, according to a new study led by researchers at the Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis. The study is among the first to show that physical activity can make the disease less deadly. more  

Team-based approach to care shows success in fight against depression with diabetes, heart disease

Many people in the U.S. have multiple common chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, which complicates health care needs. When depression coexists with diabetes, heart disease, or both, health outcomes are often less favorable. more

'Food of the gods' genome sequence could make finest chocolate better  

The production of high quality chocolate, and the farmers who grow it, will benefit from the recent sequencing and assembly of the chocolate tree genome, according to an international team led by Claire Lanaud of CIRAD, France, with Mark Guiltinan of Penn State, and including scientists from 18 other institutions. more

Trace amounts of microbe-killing molecules predict chronic granulomatous disease survival  

Investigators at the National Institutes of Health have observed that the survival rate of people with a rare immunodeficiency disease called chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is greatly improved when even very low levels of microbe-killing molecules are present. Because production of these molecules, made by an enzyme called NADPH oxidase, can be predicted from genetic analysis, a patient's risk for severe CGD could be assessed very early in life, allowing for more personalized treatment, say the researchers. more

Singapore consortium learns from nature to produce new chemical-free, anti-bacteria plastic ‘skins’

5 new US, European and Japanese companies join A*STAR’s Industrial Consortium On Nanoimprint (ICON) to engineer marine life-inspired anti-microbial surfaces for use on ships, lenses and even medical devices. Technology will also be seeded at 3 participating local polytechnics. more

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