Volume 8 Issue 103
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 13-Apr-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 14-Apr-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya
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Relationship of brain and skull more than just packaging

People usually think of the skull as packaging for the brain and researchers usually investigate them separately, but a team of researchers now thinks that developmentally and evolutionarily that the two are incontrovertibly linked. more  

Disease-impact models may rely on incorrect assumptions

Even when we know how a disease affects individual animals, it is challenging to predict what impact it will have on the whole population, and yet predicting how disease affects a population is a primary concern for wildlife conservation and even public health. In a new study from the May issue of American Naturalist, Anna E. Jolles (Princeton University and University of Groningen), Rampal S. Etienne (University of Groningen), and Han Olff (University of Groningen), contest two assumptions commonly present in models that try to predict how individual disease will impact populations. more

The night shift may lead to family nightmares

In the current issue of the Journal of Marriage and Family, researchers examine our 24-hour economy and the effect of its need for workers 24-hours a day, 7 days a week. They find that unsociable work times (hours during evenings, weekends, or nights) are associated with poorer mental health in parents and more social and emotional difficulties in children. more  

Curry coloring and fat mix could help diabetics

Brisbane immunologist Dr Brendan O'Sullivan hopes to put a dent in skyrocketing rates of diabetes in Australia by creating a new treatment for Type 2 diabetes. more

Antibiotic proves successful in tackling symptoms of acute asthma 

Researchers have demonstrated that an antibiotic is effective at treating acute asthma attacks, potentially providing a new way to help asthma sufferers. more

Stress-induced levels of corticotropin-releasing factor responsible for binge behavior  

Stressed individuals might be particularly prone to binge eating or drug addiction because of the high levels of the stress hormone corticotropin-releasing factor in their brain. more

Benefit of chemotherapy in breast cancer depends on estrogen-receptor status

When it comes to chemotherapy treatment for women whose breast cancer has spread to their lymph nodes, the estrogen status of their tumors matters, says a team of researchers in the April 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. more

 

Stressed individuals might be particularly prone to binge eating or drug addiction because of the high levels of the stress hormone corticotropin-releasing factor in their brain.