Published by: Vidyya.

Volume 13 Issue 8
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 14-Jan-2011
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 15-Jan-2011

Managing Editor: Susan Boyer, RN

©Vidyya. All rights reserved.

Share |

Today in Vidyya - 14 January 2011

 

An under considered weight loss engine is the bacteria in our gut. They play a more vigorous roll than we ever imagined. Scientists have developed chickens that don't get the flu. We wonder if they're safe to eat. Read these stories and more in today's issue of Vidyya

The microbes in our gut regulate genes that control obesity and inflammation

If you are looking to lose weight in the coming year, you may need help from an unexpected place: the bacteria in your gut. That's because scientists have discovered that the bacteria living in your intestines may play a far more significant role in weight loss and gastrointestinal problems than ever imagined. (MORE)

Race plays role in weight-related counseling among obese patients

When it comes to advising obese patients, blacks receive less weight reduction and exercise counseling from physicians than their white counterparts. This is according to a recent study conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who examined the impact of patient and doctor race concordance on weight-related counseling. The results are featured in the January 2011 online issue of Obesity. (MORE)

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome may be more vulnerable to BPA

Chevy Chase, MDA recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM), found higher Bisphenol A (BPA) levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared to controls. Furthermore, researchers found a statistically significant positive association between male sex hormones and BPA in these women suggesting a potential role of BPA in ovarian dysfunction. (MORE)

TGen and Genomic Health Inc. discover genes affecting cancer drug

PHOENIX, Ariz. Jan. 13, 2011 Genomic research could help doctors better target a drug widely used to treat colorectal cancer patients, according to a study by Genomic Health Inc. (Nasdaq: GHDX) and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).in the January issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. (MORE)

GM chickens that don't transmit bird flu developed

Chickens genetically modified to prevent them spreading bird flu have been produced by researchers at the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh. (MORE)

New guidelines for preventing falls in the elderly include: start tai chi, cut-back on meds

In the first update of the American Geriatrics Society and the British Geriatric Society's guidelines on preventing falls in older persons since 2001, they now recommend that all interventions for preventing falls should include an exercise component and that a number of new assessments should be used, including; feet and footwear, fear of falling, and ability to carry out daily living activities. The guidelines, a summary of which are published today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, also state that fall screening and prevention should be a part of all healthcare practices for older adults. (MORE)

Projections of cancer care costs in the US: 2010-2020

The estimated total cost of cancer care in the United States in 2020 is expected to be $158 billion assuming the most recent observed patterns of incidence, survival, and cost remain the same. This represents a 27% increase from 2010 due only to the projected aging and growth of the US population, according to a study published online January 12th in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute. However, the authors also note the cost of cancer care could rise even more quickly under some reasonable assumptions such as a 2% annual increase in costs of the initial and final phases of cancer care. (MORE)