Volume 11 Issue 103
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 21-Apr-2009 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 22-Apr-2009






Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

HONcode accreditation seal. We subscribe to the HONcode principles.
Verify here
.

  

 


Witnessing violence affects kidsí health

School-aged children who witness violence in urban communities show symptoms of post-traumatic stress. They also suffer physiological effects with a disruption to their normal cortisol production pattern during the day, which may have long-term negative effects on their health. more  

Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy beneficial for recurrent low-grade glioma

Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was well-tolerated and improved symptoms in patients with recurrent low-grade glioma, according to researchers from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson. The data were presented at the AACR 100th Annual Meeting 2009. more

New light on bipolar treatment drugs

Lithium has been established for more than 50 years as one of the most effective treatments for bipolar mood disorder. more  

Dark hair? Don't burn? Your genes may still put you at risk for melanoma

New genetic research suggests that the traditional risk factors for melanoma may not be as helpful in predicting risk in all people as previously thought, according to data presented at the American Association for Cancer Research 100th Annual Meeting 2009. more

Defining the link between anti-TNF therapies and increased tuberculosis  

The life of many individuals with inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis has been dramatically improved by treatment with drugs that target the protein TNF, so called anti-TNF therapies. However, anti-TNF therapies can decrease the ability of the immune system to fight infections and have been associated with an increased incidence of tuberculosis. more

Too much sugar is bad, but which sugar is worse: Fructose or glucose? 

In 2005, the average American consumed 64kg of added sugar, a sizeable proportion of which came through drinking soft drinks. Now, in a 10-week study, Peter Havel and colleagues, at the University of California at Davis, Davis, have provided evidence that human consumption of fructose-sweetened but not glucose-sweetened beverages can adversely affect both sensitivity to the hormone insulin and how the body handles fats, creating medical conditions that increase susceptibility to heart attack and stroke. more

Human lung tumors destroy anti-cancer hormone vitamin D, Pitt researchers find

Human lung tumors have the ability to eliminate Vitamin D, a hormone with anti-cancer activity, a new study from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) suggests. Results of the study, Abstract Number 2402, are being presented at the 100th annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), April 18 to 22, in Denver. more

© Vidyya. All rights reserved.

Information appearing on the Vidyya Medical News Service is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Seek professional medical help and follow your health care provider's advice.

Interested in subscribing to our daily e-mail newsletter? Send an email to Vidyya@vidyya.com with the word subscribe in the subject field.

New genetic research suggests that the traditional risk factors for melanoma may not be as helpful in predicting risk in all people as previously thought