Volume 11 Issue 110
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 29-Apr-2009 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 30-Apr-2009






Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
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Some short-term memories die suddenly, no fading

The human brain stores some kinds of memories for a lifetime. But when our eyes are open and looking at things, our gray matter also creates temporary memories that help us process complex tasks during the few seconds these visual memories exist. For decades, scientists have held that such short-term memories donít suddenly disappear, but grow gradually more imprecise over the course of several seconds. more  

Purdue study finds dairy better for bones than calcium carbonate

A Purdue University study shows dairy has an advantage over calcium carbonate in promoting bone growth and strength. more

World's largest DNA scan for autism uncovers new gene variant for disorder

UCLA scientists, in partnership with 30 research institutions across the country, have identified a new gene variant that is highly common in autistic children. And when researchers scrutinized the activity of the gene, known as CDH10, in the fetal brain, they discovered that it is most active in key regions that support language, speech and interpreting social behavior. more  

Potential preventative therapy for Type 1 diabetes

Scientists believe they may have found a preventative therapy for Type 1 diabetes, by making the body's killer immune cells tolerate the insulin-producing cells they would normally attack and destroy, prior to disease onset. more

Topical cream studied as way to treat skin cancer without the knife  

In a case study of a type of melanoma skin cancer typically found on chronically sun-exposed skin, Saint Louis University researchers found that imiquimod, a topical cream, produced good results for patients when used together with surgery to treat the cancer, potentially helping doctors cut less. more

Older men more likely than women to die after pneumonia 

Differing biological response to infection between men and women may explain higher death rates among older men who are hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The findings, published online in the Critical Care Medicine journal, may have important implications for understanding sex differences in life expectancy. more

Oxytocin: Love potion #1?

Relationships are difficult and most of us probably think at some point that communicating positively with our partner when discussing stressful issues, like home finances, is an impossible task. What if there was a safe way to take the "edge" off these discussions? The biology of human social relationships is just beginning to emerge as groundbreaking research on social cognition conducted in animals is now informing research in humans. more

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Information appearing on the Vidyya Medical News Service is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Seek professional medical help and follow your health care provider's advice.

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Is oxytocin a love potion?