Volume 11 Issue 199
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 3-Aug-2009 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 4-Aug-2009






Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Millions of US children low in vitamin D

Seven out of ten U.S. children have low levels of vitamin D, raising their risk of bone and heart disease, according to a study of over 6,000 children by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. The striking findings suggest that vitamin D deficiency could place millions of children at risk for high blood pressure and other risk factors for heart disease. The study is published today in the online version of Pediatrics. more  

Researchers effectively treat tumors with use of nanotubes

By injecting man-made, microscopic tubes into tumors and heating them with a quick, 30-second zap of a laser, scientists have discovered a way to effectively kill kidney tumors in nearly 80 percent of mice. Researchers say that the finding suggests a potential future cancer treatment for humans. more

New national study finds increase in P.E. class-related injuries

Physical education (PE) in schools is one of the main tools used to increase physical activity and to prevent childhood obesity, and PE-related injuries are on the rise. Although increasing physical activity may reduce obesity, it may also increase the risk of injury. While recognizing that PE classes and physical activity are important components in combating obesity, parents and school administrators should remain vigilant for injuries. more  

Pancreatic cancer risk decreased by one anti-diabetic therapy, increased by others

The antidiabetic medication metformin is associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics, according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute. However, other commonly used therapies, such as insulin or insulin secretagogues, may be associated with increased risk for the deadly disease. more

Scientists learn why even treated genital herpes sores boost the risk of HIV infection  

New research helps explain why infection with herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), which causes genital herpes, increases the risk for HIV infection even after successful treatment heals the genital skin sores and breaks that often result from HSV-2. more

Stem cell 'daughters' lead to breast cancer 

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute scientists have found that a population of breast cells called luminal progenitor cells are likely to be responsible for breast cancers that develop in women carrying mutations in the gene BRCA1. more

Variation in prostate stem cell antigen gene raises bladder cancer risk

Researchers have pinpointed a specific gene variation that causes increased risk of urinary bladder cancer, according to a scientific team led by The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. more

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Seven out of ten U.S. children have low levels of vitamin D, raising their risk of bone and heart disease

 



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