Volume 11 Issue 241
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 15-Sep-2009 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 16-Sep-2009






Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
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Brain's response to seeing food may be linked to weight loss maintenance

A difference in brain activity patterns may explain why some people are able to maintain a significant weight loss while others regain the weight, according to a new study by researchers with The Miriam Hospital. more  

Supplementing babies' formula with DHA boosts cognitive development

Research has shown that children who were breast fed as infants have superior cognitive skills compared to those fed infant formula, and it's thought that this is due to an essential fatty acid in breast milk called docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Now a new study has found that babies fed formula supplemented with DHA have higher cognitive skills than babies fed regular formula. more

Guideline: Kids with small head size at risk of neurologic problems, screening needed

A new guideline from the American Academy of Neurology, developed in full collaboration with the Child Neurology Society, finds that children with microcephaly --that is, children whose head size is smaller than that of 97 percent of children--are at risk of neurologic and cognitive problems and should be screened for these problems. The guideline is published in the September 15, 2009, issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. more  

Laser processes promise better artificial joints, arterial stents

Researchers are developing technologies that use lasers to create arterial stents and longer-lasting medical implants that could be manufactured 10 times faster and also less expensively than is now possible. more

Weeding out marijuana: Researchers close in on engineering recognizable, drug-free Cannabis plant  

first step toward engineering a drug-free Cannabis plant for hemp fiber and oil, University of Minnesota researchers have identified genes producing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive substance in marijuana. Studying the genes could also lead to new and better drugs for pain, nausea and other conditions. more

The role of genetic factors in adult ADHD  

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ADHD, is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders of childhood. Worldwide, 3% of children are affected with the disorder. Key symptoms of ADHD include age-inappropriate hyperactive and impulsive behaviour and/or a reduced ability to focus attention. Clinically, three different ADHD subtypes are classified, a primarily inattentive subtype, a primarily hyperactive/impulsive subtype, and a combined subtype in which patients show deficits in both domains. At the level of the brain, small aberrations in both structure and activity of specific brain regions, as well as the connectivity between brain regions have been observed in children and adults with ADHD (Valera et al., 2007; Schneider et al., 2006; Makris et al., 2008; Pavuluri et al., 2009; Broyd et al., 2009). more

The making of mucus in common lung diseases

In the lung, mucus is produced by cells known as goblet cells, which are present in small numbers in the walls of the lungs and airways. Many inflammatory stimuli, including allergens, cigarette smoke, and chronic infections, increase the number and activity of these goblet cells. This leads to mucus hyperproduction and subsequent airway obstruction and contributes to symptoms in several common lung diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). more

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A new study has found that babies fed formula supplemented with DHA have higher cognitive skills than babies fed regular formula.