Volume 11 Issue 245
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 18-Sep-2009 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 19-Sep-2009






Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Using magnetism to turn drugs on and off

Many medical conditions, such as chronic pain, cancer and diabetes, require medications that cannot be taken orally, but must be dosed intermittently, on an as-needed basis, over a long period of time. A few delivery techniques have been developed, using an implanted heat source, an implanted electronic chip or other stimuli as an "on-off" switch to release the drugs into the body. But thus far, none of these methods can reliably do all that's needed: repeatedly turn dosing on and off, deliver consistent doses and adjust doses according to the patient's need. more  

Scientists pinpoint protein link to fat storage

A protein found present in all cells in the body could help scientists better understand how we store fat. more

Genes controlling insulin can alter timing of biological clock

Many of the genes that regulate insulin also alter the timing of the circadian clock, a new study has found. more  

Misunderstood expressions facilitate adolescent aggression

Juvenile delinquency may be a result of misunderstood social cues. Research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health shows that male juvenile delinquents frequently misinterpret facial expressions of disgust as anger, providing a possible cause for their aggressive behavior. more

Pediatric strokes more than twice as common as previously reported  

Imaging studies along with diagnostic codes on medical charts show that the rate of strokes in infants and children is two to four times higher than commonly thought, researchers report in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. more

Vaccine to prevent urinary tract infections shows early promise  

University of Michigan (U-M) Scientists have made an important step toward what could become the first vaccine in the U.S. to prevent urinary tract infections, if the robust immunity achieved in mice can be reproduced in humans. The findings are published September 18 in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens. more

45,000 excess deaths annually linked to lack of health insurance: Harvard study

A study published online on 17 September estimates nearly 45,000 annual deaths are associated with lack of health insurance. That figure is about two and a half times higher than an estimate from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2002. more

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Scientists have made an important step toward what could become the first vaccine in the U.S. to prevent urinary tract infections