Volume 11 Issue 27
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 29-Jan-2009 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 30-Jan-2009



Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Readers build vivid mental simulations of narrative situations, brain scans suggest

A new brain-imaging study is shedding light on what it means to "get lost" in a good book suggesting that readers create vivid mental simulations of the sounds, sights, tastes and movements described in a textual narrative while simultaneously activating brain regions used to process similar experiences in real life. more  

Weight loss reduces incontinence in obese women, UCSF study shows

Behavioral weight-loss programs can be an effective way to reduce urinary incontinence in women who are overweight or obese, according to a study led by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco. more

Did I see what I think I saw?

Eyewitness testimony is a crucial part of many criminal trials even though research increasingly suggests that it may not be as accurate as we (and many lawyers) would like it to be. For example, if you witness a man in a blue sweater stealing something, then overhear people talking about a gray shirt, how likely are you to remember the real color of the thief's sweater? Studies have shown that when people are told false information about an event, they become less likely to remember what actually happened - it is easy to mix up the real facts with fake ones. more  

Breast cancer drug shows promise for treating, preventing progestin-dependent tumors

Recent studies suggest that human breast cancer risk is increased by outside exposure to the hormone progestin, such as during hormone replacement therapy. Now, a University of Missouri study suggests that PRIMA-1, a small molecule drug that targets the most common mutated gene, p53, in human cancer cells, has potential as a novel chemotherapeutic treatment for progestin-accelerated human breast cancer. more

Study finds 'rescue course' of antenatal steroids improves outcome in premature babies  

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, researchers will unveil findings that show that premature babies born before 34 weeks have a 31 percent reduction in serious complications when given a "rescue course" of Antenatal Corticosteroids (ACS) steroids with no adverse side effects noted. more

New study explores the relationship between preterm birth and autism spectrum disorder 

Recent studies have suggested that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be more prevalent among children born very prematurely. The early symptoms of ASD are also associated with other conditions related to preterm births, such as cerebral palsy, which can make it difficult to correctly screen children for ASD. Because of this, researchers have begun to explore the relationship between preterm birth, cognitive and developmental impairments, and ASD. Two articles soon to be published in The Journal of Pediatrics explore this possible correlation between preterm birth and ASD. more

Scientists make malaria parasite work to reveal its own vulnerabilities

Researchers seeking ways to defeat malaria have found a way to get help from the parasite that causes the disease. more

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A new brain-imaging study is shedding light on what it means to "get lost" in a good book