Volume 11 Issue 274
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 17-Oct-2009 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 18-Oct-2009






Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
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Scientists demonstrate link between genetic defect and brain changes in schizophrenia

For decades, scientists have thought the faulty neural wiring that predisposes individuals to behavioral disorders like autism and psychiatric diseases like schizophrenia must occur during development. Even so, no one has ever shown that a risk gene for the disease actually disrupts brain development. more  

Maternal HIV-1 treatment protects against transmission to newborns

Mothers receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to treat HIV-1 infection are less likely than untreated mothers to transmit the virus to their newborns through breastfeeding, according to a new study. The findings, now available online in the Nov. 15 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, suggest HAART regimens should be initiated as early as possible in eligible mothers in areas with limited resources, such as Africa, where most infant HIV-1 infections occur, and breastfeeding is common. more

The cancer genome atlas project to map 20 tumor types

During a visit to the NIH campus last week, President Barack Obama announced that NIH will spend $275 million over the next 2 years to catalogue the genetic changes driving more than 20 types of cancer. more  

Experts tackle the challenge of managing ductal carcinoma in situ

One of the controversies in oncology today concerns how to treat ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a common pre-cancer of the breast that accounts for at least 20 percent of all breast cancer diagnoses. Nearly 100 percent of patients with DCIS achieve long-term disease-free survival with current therapies. more

Adapting capsule endoscopy for colorectal cancer screening  

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality recommends colorectal cancer screening for average-risk adults between the ages of 50 and 75 with one of the following methods: annual fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy every 5 years, or colonoscopy every 10 years. However, as of 2005, only 59 percent of people aged 50 or older had been screened according to these recommendations, and only 50 percent had had a colorectal endoscopy procedure (either sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, screening techniques that can both visualize cancer in the colon and rectum and remove precancerous polyps) within the past 10 years. more

Fraudulent H1N1 products widget  

Place this Fraudulent H1N1 Products Widget on your Web site, portal home page, or in your blog to allow you and your visitors to search for Fraudulent H1N1 Products. more

FDA warns of unapproved and illegal H1N1 drug products purchased over the internet

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today warned consumers to use extreme care when purchasing any products over the Internet that claim to diagnose, prevent, treat or cure the H1N1 influenza virus. The warning comes after the FDA recently purchased and analyzed several products represented online as Tamiflu (oseltamivir), which may pose risks to patients. more

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today warned consumers to use extreme care when purchasing any products over the Internet that claim to diagnose, prevent, treat or cure the H1N1 influenza virus.