Volume 11 Issue 278
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 21-Oct-2009 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 22-Oct-2009






Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Studies improve knowledge of underlying brain changes caused by addiction

New research using animal models is enabling a deeper understanding of the neurobiology of compulsive drug addiction in humans knowledge that may lead to more effective treatment options to weaken the powerful cravings that cause people to relapse. The findings were released today at Neuroscience 2009, the Society for Neuroscience's annual meeting and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. more  

Blood test shows promise for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

Elderly people exhibiting memory disturbances that do not affect their normal, daily life suffer from a condition called "mild cognitive impairment" (MCI). Some MCI patients go on to develop Alzheimer's disease within a few years, whereas other cases remain stable, exhibiting only benign senile forgetfulness. more

Melanoma treatment options 1 step closer

A targeted chemotherapy for the treatment of skin cancer is one step closer, after a team of University of Alberta researchers successfully synthesized a natural substance that shows exceptional potential to specifically treat this often fatal disease. more  

Think what you eat: Studies point to cellular factors linking diet and behavior

New research released today is affirming a long-held maxim: you are what you eat and, more to the point, what you eat has a profound influence on the brain. The findings offer insight into the neurobiological factors behind the obesity epidemic in the United States and other developed countries. more

Drinking coffee slows progression of liver disease in chronic hepatitis C sufferers  

Patients with chronic hepatitis C and advanced liver disease who drink three or more cups of coffee per day have a 53% lower risk of liver disease progression than non-coffee drinkers according to a new study led by Neal Freedman, Ph.D., MPH, from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). more

Presidential election outcome changed voters' testosterone  

Young men who voted for Republican John McCain or Libertarian candidate Robert Barr in the 2008 presidential election suffered an immediate drop in testosterone when the election results were announced, according to a study by researchers at Duke University and the University of Michigan. more

Treatment for epilepsy is a possible culprit for development of schizophrenia

Researchers say antiepilectic drug treatments administered when the brain is developing appear to trigger schizophrenia-like behavior in animal models. In humans, having a history of seizures in infancy is a significant risk factor for development of schizophrenia later in life, but it is not known whether the elevated risk is due to seizures themselves, or from side effects antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. more

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Patients with chronic hepatitis C and advanced liver disease who drink three or more cups of coffee per day have a 53% lower risk of liver disease progression