Volume 11 Issue 90
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 6-Apr-2009 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 7-Apr-2009



Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
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Broccoli sprouts may prevent stomach cancer by defeating Helicobacter pylori

Three-day-old broccoli sprouts, a widely available human food, suppressed Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections, according to a report in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. H. pylori infections are one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide and are a major cause of stomach cancer. more  

Poison: It's what's for dinner

As the U.S. Southwest grew warmer from 18,700 to 10,000 years ago, juniper trees vanished from what is now the Mojave Desert, robbing packrats of their favorite food. Now, University of Utah biologists have narrowed the hunt for detoxification genes that let the rodents eat toxic creosote bushes that replaced juniper. more

Hollow mask illusion fails to fool schizophrenia patients

Patients with schizophrenia are able to correctly see through an illusion known as the ‘hollow mask’ illusion, probably because their brain disconnects ‘what the eyes see’ from what ‘the brain thinks it is seeing’, according to a joint UK and German study published in the journal NeuroImage. The findings shed light on why cannabis users may also be less deceived by the illusion whilst on the drug. more  

"Magic potion" in fly spit may shoo away blinding eye disease

Researchers are reporting the first identification of a "magic potion" of proteins in the saliva of the black fly that help this blood-sucking pest spread parasites that cause "river blindness," a devastating eye-disease. A better understanding of these proteins may lead to better drugs and a vaccine for river blindness and other diseases spread by biting insects. Also known as onchocerciasis, river blindness affects more than 17 million people worldwide, particularly in rural Africa. The report appears in the current edition of ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, a monthly publication. more

Bonanza of new oral drugs offers hope for MS patients  

Years of scientific research on multiple sclerosis (MS) are showing signs of paying off, with almost a dozen potential new drugs in the final stages of clinical trials and moving toward pharmacy shelves, according to an article scheduled for the April 6 issue of Chemical & Engineering News, ACS' weekly newsmagazine. Those drugs could double the number of medications available to treat MS — which affects about 400,000 people in the United States — over the next several years. more

Working through the menopause 

Some women sail through it, others find it a challenge but few women like to talk openly about the menopause. more

Alternative therapies can be safe, effective for children

Today, more children than ever are being treated with complementary and alternative therapies. Recent studies indicate that about 30 percent of healthy children and up to 50 percent of children with chronic disease are using some kind of alternative therapy. more

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Information appearing on the Vidyya Medical News Service is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Seek professional medical help and follow your health care provider's advice.

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Three-day-old broccoli sprouts, a widely available human food, suppresses Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections