Volume 12 Issue 95
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 6-Apr-2010 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 7-Apr-2010






Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

HONcode accreditation seal. We subscribe to the HONcode principles.
Verify here
.

  

 


Only women with Western Swedish breast cancer gene run higher risk of ovarian cancer

Previous research has shown that women with breast cancer are more likely than other women to develop ovarian cancer, but now researchers from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have shown that actually only women with a known Western Swedish mutation behind hereditary breast cancer run this increased risk of ovarian cancer. more  

Fatal injuries increase in older Americans: Significant increases seen in deaths from falls, motorcycle crashes, machinery use and poisoning

The risk of dying from injuries is increasing for Americans ages 65 and older according to a new report from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for Injury Research and Policy. The report found significant increases in death rates from falls (42 percent increase), machinery (46 percent increase), motorcycle crashes (145 percent increase) and unintentional poisoning (34 percent increase). The results are published in the February issue of Injury Prevention and are available online at the journal’s website. more

Exposure to 3 classes of common chemicals may affect female development

Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have found that exposure to three common chemical classes—phenols, phthalates and phytoestrogens—in young girls may disrupt the timing of pubertal development, and put girls at risk for health complications later in life. The study, the first to examine the effects of these chemicals on pubertal development, is currently published online in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives and also appears in today's issue of Vidyya. more  

Investigation of relationships between urinary biomarkers of phytoestrogens, phthalates, and phenols and pubertal stages in girls

Hormonally active environmental agents may alter the course of pubertal development in girls, which is controlled by steroids and gonadotropins. more

Researchers find a better way to track stem cells  

A study published in the current issue of Cell Transplantation (19:1) has found that using the FDA-approved contrast agent Indocyanine Green (ICG) to label human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) substantially improved efforts to optically track stem cells after transplanting them into heart tissues. more

Major study underway to evaluate Botox versus medication for female bladder control  

A new study is underway at Loyola University Health System (LUHS) to compare botulinum toxin A or Botox® versus common oral medications for urge incontinence in women. Urge incontinence is urinary incontinence with a strong or sudden need to urinate. Millions of women suffer in silence each day from this condition. more

Clinical benefit of multiple sclerosis drug discovered

A drug whose clinical benefit in treating multiple sclerosis was discovered at Rush University Medical Center was approved by the Food and Drug Administration on January 22 and is now available in the U.S. more

© Vidyya. All rights reserved.

Information appearing on the Vidyya Medical News Service is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Seek professional medical help and follow your health care provider's advice.

Interested in subscribing to our daily e-mail newsletter? Send an email to Vidyya@vidyya.com with the word subscribe in the subject field.

Dalfampridine is the first therapy for multiple sclerosis that can be taken orally