Vidyya Medical News Service
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Volume 5 Issue 21 Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 21-Jan-2003 Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 22-Jan-2003
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Prescription drug abuse rising rapidly
Abuse of prescription drugs is rising rapidly in the United States. Data released today indicate that in 2001 almost three million youth aged 12 to 17 had used prescription medications non-medically in their lifetimes. The data were released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) at a joint press conference with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to focus public attention on the dangers of abusing prescription medications.  more

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Information for patients: Misuse of prescription pain relievers can kill you
The most dangerous prescription pain relievers are those containing drugs known as opioids, such as morphine and codeine. Some common drugs containing these substances include Darvon®, Demerol®, Dilaudid®, OxyContin®, Tylenol® with Codeine, and Vicodin®. Your patients probably call these drugs by their street names: ac/dc, coties, demmies, dillies, hillbilly heroin, o.c., oxy, oxycotton, percs and vics to name a few. Whatever the name, it's important for all to understand they can be killers. This brochure appears in this issue of Vidyya courtesy of the US Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). more

 


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Minimum smallpox vaccination is best strategy for now, experts say
The current smallpox vaccination policy of vaccinating a very limited number of first responders to a potential smallpox outbreak and avoiding mass vaccination is the best vaccination strategy, say two smallpox experts in an article in Annals of Internal Medicine. more

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Supply and demand and illicit drugs
Evan Wood and colleagues report that the largest seizure of heroin in Canadian history, which occurred in Vancouver in September 2000, actually had no impact on the injection use of heroin or on perceived availability of the drug on the street. more

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Lower blood pressure decreases heart attack risk in diabetics with clogged leg arteries
Lowering blood pressure can reduce heart attacks and other cardiovascular events in diabetics who also have clogged leg arteries, according to a study in today's rapid access issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.  more

 
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