Vidyya Medical News Service
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Volume 5 Issue 302 Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 29-Oct-2003 Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 30-Oct-2003
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FDA Statement on tetrahydrogestrinone (THG)
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently been made aware of a substance called tetrahydrogestrinone (THG), which is reportedly used by athletes to improve their performance. Based on the agency's analysis of this product, FDA has determined that THG is an unapproved new drug. As such, it cannot be legally marketed without FDA approval.  more

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Download the Glycemic index may be a beneficial tool in food selection and meal planning
The glycemic index may be a beneficial tool in food selection and meal planning, according to leading health experts who explored the issues and scientific research related to the glycemic index at the American Dietetic Association's Food & Nutrition Conference & Exhibition (FNCE).  more

 


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New guidelines on unrelated marrow transplants: A roadmap for physicians
Georgetown University Medical Center researcher Carolyn Hurley, Ph.D. and colleagues have developed new comprehensive national guidelines on bone marrow transplantation that involve donors unrelated to the patient. The guidelines, which encourage transplant physicians to develop robust donor search strategies, have been issued by the National Marrow Donor Program and appear as a commentary in the current issue of the journal Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation.  more

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The nose knows if the patient is psychotic
The nose could provide the first reliable diagnostic tool for predicting a personís likelihood of developing psychosis, new research has found.  more

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Dietary ginger may work against cancer growth
The substance that gives ginger its flavor appears to inhibit the growth of human colorectal cancer cells, according to research at the University of Minnesota's Hormel Institute in Austin, Minn. Working with mice that lack an immune system, research associate professor Ann Bode and her colleagues found slower rates of cancer growth in mice given thrice-weekly feedings of [6]-gingerol--the main active component of ginger.  more

 
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