Vidyya Medical News Service
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Volume 5 Issue 309 Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 5-Nov-2003 Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 6-Nov-2003
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NIH scientists show nitrite improves blood flow
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have determined that nitrite, a common small ion, or salt, in blood, can improve blood flow by opening blood vessels. This increases oxygen in the blood and makes it a potential new treatment for diseases such as high blood pressure, heart attacks, sickle cell disease, and leg vascular problems.  more

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U.S. pregnancy rate down from peak; births and abortions on the decline
The number of pregnancies in the United States in 1999 dropped 7 percent from the peak in 1990. There were 6.28 million U.S. pregnancies in 1999 compared with 6.78 million in 1990. The 1999 total pregnancy count includes about 3.96 million live births, 1.31 million induced abortions, and 1 million fetal losses (miscarriages and stillbirths).  more

 


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Eat more; exercise more; live longer
Despite widespread attention to diet, calorie intake may not be a major factor in causing death by heart disease, according to a 17-year study of almost 9,800 Americans. Instead, losing excess weight -- or not becoming overweight to begin with -- and exercising may do more to ward off death from heart disease, say Jing Fang, M.D., and colleagues from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York.  more

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Lycopene supplement may not lower prostate cancer risk
A tomato a day may help keep prostate cancer at bay ó but a widely used dietary supplement derived from tomatoes may not be sufficient. Thatís the conclusion of the first animal study comparing the cancer-preventing potential of tomato products to that of lycopene, a substance extracted from tomatoes and taken by many men in hopes of warding off prostate cancer.  more

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Gender differences in brain response to pain
A new UCLA study shows that different parts of the brain are stimulated in reaction to pain depending on gender. The research, which represents the largest gender-comparison study of its kind, focused on people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), one of the nation's most common chronic medical conditions. The findings may help develop and target better treatments for IBS and other illnesses.  more

 
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