Vidyya Medical News Service
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Volume 6 Issue 212 Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 30-Jul-2004 Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 31-Jul-2004
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Blood test will help diabetic patients avoid leg amputation
A simple blood test can now predict the probability of success for a procedure that can save the lower leg of diabetic patients facing amputation according to a study presented at the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Societyís (AOFAS) annual meeting today.

The study, conducted by Alastair Younger, M.D. and Colin Meakin, M.D. at St. Paulís Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, examined 21 patients with diabetes who received successful partial foot amputations and 21 diabetic patients who experienced a failed amputation. Those with a 7% or lower level of glucose in their blood had a high rate of success with a partial foot amputation and did not need a blow knee amputation (BKA).  more

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FDA approves new drug for treatment of alcoholism
FDA today approved the drug Campral (acamprosate), for treating alcohol dependent individuals seeking to continue to remain alcohol-free after they have stopped drinking. Campral may not be effective in patients who are actively drinking at the start of treatment, or in patients who abuse other substances in addition to alcohol.  more

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Hypnosis more helpful to men than women in quitting smoking
Men who try hypnosis to help them quit smoking are more likely to be successful than women who use the same treatment, according to new research.  more

 


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Common osteoarthritis drugs are ineffective after two weeks
Using topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) to relieve the pain of osteoarthritis is only beneficial for the first two weeks.  more

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UW researcher links storytelling and mathematical ability
Math and storytelling may seem like very different abilities, but a new study by University of Waterloo scientist Daniela O'Neill suggests that preschool children's early storytelling abilities are predictive of their mathematical ability two years later. The study has just been published in the June 2004 issue of the journal First Language.  more

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Prion finding offers insight into spontaneous protein diseases
To date epilepsy research has mainly concentrated on the transmission of the nerve cell signals to what are known as the synapses. However, recent observations by medical researchers from the US, France and the University of Bonn support the idea that in 'falling sickness' the signal processing in the nerve cells (neurons) is altered: normally specific ion channels absorb the neuronal activity. In rats suffering from epilepsy, however, this signals brake seems impaired: they have far fewer functioning ion channels than healthy rats. more

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Scientists finger surprise culprit in spinal cord injury
ATP, the vital energy source that keeps our body's cells alive, runs amok at the site of a spinal cord injury, pouring into the area around the wound and killing the cells that normally allow us to move.  more

 
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