Vidyya Medical News Service
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Volume 6 Issue 288 Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 14-Oct-2004 Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 15-Oct-2004
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Mind Science: Coke versus Pepsi - It's all in the head
The preference for Coke versus Pepsi is not only a matter for the tongue to decide, Samuel McClure and his colleagues have found. Brain scans of people tasting the soft drinks reveal that knowing which drink they're tasting affects their preference and activates memory-related brain regions that recall cultural influences. Thus, say the researchers, they have shown neurologically how a culturally based brand image influences a behavioral choice.  more

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Melanin makes skin vulnerable to harmful ultraviolet rays
Blondes and redheads not only are more susceptible to skin cancer, but the source of their skin and hair pigmentation, melanin, actually magnifies the damaging effects of ultraviolet (UV) rays.  more

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Flu crisis need not cost lives
Despite the halving of the US's flu vaccine supply, there could be fewer deaths than normal this winter if people follow official advice, New Scientist's analysis suggests. Last week the UK's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency suspended the licence of a factory in Liverpool owned by Chiron Vaccines. more

 


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Mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma
A study from the Institute of Environmental Medicine (IMM) at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, found that 10 or more years of mobile phone use increase the risk of acoustic neuroma and that the risk increase was confined to the side of the head where the phone was usually held. No indications of an increased risk for less than 10 years of mobile phone use were found.  more

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Portion control induces greatest weight loss
The journal, Obesity Research, today published an article on the results of a 24-month federally funded obesity study led by Summa Health System researchers in Akron, Ohio. The study is the first to document that patients who spend a longer time in the action and maintenance stages for portion control or planned exercise were more likely to lose weight. The reverse was also true.  more

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Angiogenesis therapy successful for peripheral arterial disease
Duke University Medical Center researchers have shown that they can stimulate the body to produce its own naturally occurring growth factors to promote blood vessel growth into tissue damaged by peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD). They said their finding could offer a new approach to treating the disease, which rivals coronary artery disease in its prevalence and health impact. more

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Major overhaul needed in end-of life care for patients with dementia
Three University of Chicago geriatricians are calling for creative and wide-reaching solutions to the problem of sub-optimal end-of-life care for patients with dementia. An estimated 500,000 people die every year in the United States suffering from Alzheimer's or related diseases and many of them receive inadequate pain control, are subjected to ineffective and invasive therapies such as tube feedings, and do not receive the benefits of hospice care. more

 
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