Volume 7 Issue 116
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 26-Apr-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 27-Apr-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

  

 


Few US adults report having a healthy lifestyle

Despite clear evidence of the health benefits, few U.S. adults conform to four common healthy behaviors that together characterize a healthy lifestyle, according to the April 25 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. more  

Risk scores may identify young individuals with atherosclerosis

Young people with atherosclerotic lesions may be identified by a risk score calculated from coronary heart disease factors like obesity, sex, age, cholesterol, and smoking, according to an article in the April 25 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. more

Natural glucose byproduct may prevent brain damage and cognitive impairment after diabetic coma

A natural, non-toxic byproduct of glucose may prevent brain cell death and cognitive impairment in diabetics following an episode of severely low blood sugar, according to researchers at the San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC). more  

54 per cent of air passengers experience significant reduction in oxygen levels

More than half of air travellers find that their oxygen saturation drops to a level at which many hospital patients would be prescribed extra oxygen, according to a paper in the May issue of Anaesthesia. more

Chest x-rays may provide information to help detect osteoporosis in the elderly 

Undetected osteoporosis in the elderly might be discovered if chest radiographs (x-ray images) that are done for other reasons were examined for fractures of the vertebrae, according to an article in the April 25 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. more

Stem cells from brain transformed to produce insulin at Stanford  

With careful coaxing, stem cells from the brain can form insulin-producing cells that mimic those missing in people with diabetes, according to a paper published in the April 26 issue of PLoS Medicine. more

Increased risk associated with combining carotid artery, coronary artery surgeries

Among patients undergoing evaluation for coronary artery bypass surgery, stroke neurologists are frequently consulted when the patient also has severe carotid artery stenosis (blockage of an artery that supplies blood to the brain). In a small number of these cases, a carotid endarterectomy is performed at the same time as the bypass surgery, with the assumption that combining the procedures in a single surgical event may decrease subsequent risk of stroke or death. While combining these procedures has become more routine, a recent Canadian study, published in the April 26 issue of Neurology, suggests there is little evidence to demonstrate that this practice reduces the risk of stroke or death. more

 

Most American adults don't have a healthy lifestyle.