Volume 7 Issue 144
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 24-May-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 25-May-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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Obesity is risk factor for aggressive prostate cancer

Obesity appears to increase the risk of prostate cancer, particularly aggressive disease, and may make it harder to find, researchers say. more  

Children need better cancer drugs, says expert panel

Market forces alone are not sufficient to produce new drugs needed for children with cancer, according to a new report by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). Faced with "a near absence of research in pediatric cancer drug discovery," the IOM report recommends forming new public-private partnerships among government, industry, researchers, advocacy groups and other parties to lead research and development. more

UCLA study tackles aging issues of adults with developmental disabilities

Some 4.5 million Americans have a developmental disability. As people live longer, adults with developmental disabilities are no exception, yet their conditions also bring aging-related challenges. A new study by UCLA and Casa Colina Centers for Rehabilitation reports that a geriatric evaluation and follow-up visits by a nurse practitioner can detect and reduce health problems in this population that often go unaddressed by the healthcare system. more  

Men with spouses, partners, fare better after prostate cancer treatment

Being married or in a relationship significantly improves quality of life for prostate cancer patients following treatment, according to a study by researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center and the Department of Urology. Partnered men reported better psychosocial and spiritual well-being, suffered fewer adverse effects from treatment and had less fear and anxiety about their cancer coming back than did their single counterparts, the study found. more

Risks outweigh benefits of shark cartilage as anti-cancer treatment  

As a treatment for advanced cancer, shark cartilage fails to benefit patients and its adverse effects lead to poor compliance. more

Depression common in people with chronic cough 

More than half of people with chronic cough-a nagging cough that can last for months or even years-suffer from depressive symptoms, according to a study to be presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference on May 23. more

Surgery no better than rehabilitation for low back pain

Surgery for chronic low back pain is no better than intensive rehabilitation and is unlikely to be a cost-effective use of scarce healthcare resources, show two studies published online by the BMJ today. more

 

Surgery no better than rehabilitation for low back pain