Volume 7 Issue 157
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 6-Jun-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 7-Jun-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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Suppressing growth hormone in early adulthood may prevent cancer

A modest suppression of growth hormone and related compounds beginning in early adulthood may delay the onset or progression of several types of cancer, researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and other centers reported today at ENDO 2005, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in San Diego. more  

Researchers report breakthrough against world’s deadliest viruses

Scientists from the Public Health Agency of Canada - with assistance from the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases - have developed vaccines against the Ebola and Marburg viruses that have been shown to be effective in non-human primates. more

Students heed parents on credit card advice

Parents are by far the primary source of information and advice for traditional college students as regards credit card usage. Furthermore, the more information provided by parents, the lower the credit card debt incurred by their college age children, a Penn State study shows. more  

Researchers develop gene therapy to reverse pulmonary arterial hypertension

A University of Alberta research team has discovered important new information they hope will lead to more effective treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)--a deadly form of high blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries caused by uncontrolled cell growth. Therapies are currently limited for a disease that can lead to heart failure and death within a few years. more

Variant prion protein causes infection but no symptoms  

Abnormal prion proteins are little understood disease agents involved in causing horrific brain-wasting diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease in people, mad cow disease in cattle and chronic wasting disease in deer and elk. Now, new research suggests that a variant form of abnormal prion protein — one lacking an “anchor” into the cell membrane — may be unable to signal cells to start the lethal disease process, according to scientists at the Rocky Mountain Laboratories (RML), part of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health. more

Genetic variation alters response to common anti–clotting drug 

Millions of people take the anticoagulant drug warfarin to prevent harmful clotting after a heart attack, stroke, or major surgery. But the proper dose of warfarin can vary greatly and can be hard to predict. Some of this variability may boil down to a recently identified gene involved in blood clotting, according to a new study published in the June 2 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. more

Experimental shingles vaccine proves effective in nationwide study

In one of the largest adult vaccine clinical trials ever, researchers have found that an experimental vaccine against shingles (zoster vaccine) prevented about half of cases of shingles — a painful nerve and skin infection — and dramatically reduced its severity and complications in vaccinated persons who got the disease. The findings appear in the June 2 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. more

 

Children do listen to their parents. Even when it comes to credit card use.