Volume 7 Issue 188
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 7-Jul-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 8-Jul-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Enzyme affects hypertension by controlling salt levels in body

An enzyme known to cause hypertension increases blood pressure by activating tiny pores, or channels, in kidney cells that allow increased levels of sodium to be reabsorbed into the blood, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found. The findings shed light on the underlying mechanisms that cause hypertension, and may also help explain why patients with hypertension linked to salt intake often need to take potassium supplements in order to keep their high blood pressure in check. more  

Interim data suggest major response with Aranesp(R) in anemic patients with MDS

Amgen Inc. announced new interim data from a Phase 2 study evaluating the use of 500 mcg of Aranesp(R) (darbepoetin alfa) every three weeks to treat anemia in patients with a bone marrow disorder known as myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). more

Prescribing information: Aranesp

Aranesp is a unique erythropoiesis stimulating protein, which contains two additional sialic acid-containing carbohydrate chains than the Epoetin alfa molecule and remains in the bloodstream longer than Epoetin alfa because it has a longer half-life. more  

Discovering the pathways by which the same factors that disrupt the structure of breast tissue cause cancers to develop

Researchers in the Life Sciences Division of the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have discovered a key molecular pathway by which an enzyme that normally helps remodel tissues initiates the pathway to breast cancer. The same molecular pathway, the researchers found, links both the loss of tissue organization in cancerous organs and the loss of genomic stability in individual cancer cells. more

Neurological complication may result from rapid withdrawal from pregabalin, more studies needed 

A report in the July Annals of Neurology describes a serious adverse event experienced by a participant in a clinical trial that may raise a new caution about the use of antiepileptic drugs for conditions other than epilepsy. An elderly women enrolled in a clinical trial of pregabalin, a new drug for the treatment of pain and seizures, abruptly discontinued the medication and then developed neurological symptoms including headache, confusion and hallucinations. The study's authors from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) suggest that all patients stopping antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) should do so gradually to avoid complications of withdrawal. more

Adult lifestyle biggest risk factor for diabetes, study finds  

Adult lifestyle has more influence on your chances of developing diabetes than childhood experience, according to new research whose findings contradict previously-held beliefs. more

Scientists discover how Nipah virus enters cells

Working independently, two research teams funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), have identified how Nipah and Hendra viruses, closely related viruses first identified in the mid-1990s, gain entry into human and animal cells. more

 

In a recent study, myelodysplastic syndrome patients receiving Aranesp every three weeks, who had no prior erythropoietic therapy, exhibited an overall response of 77 percent, increased hemoglobin levels and improvements in patient reported fatigue.