Volume 7 Issue 193
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 12-Jul-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 13-Jul-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Body mass index proves to be an unexpectedly valuable tool for runners

The conspicuous size differences between beefy sprinters and lithesome distance runners are dictated by simple rules of form and function, according to researchers from Rice University and the Texas Medical Center's National Center for Human Performance. Specifically, the greater bulk of speed demons is explained by their need to hit the running surface harder to attain their faster speeds. more  

Naturally occurring asbestos linked to lung cancer

Everyday exposure to naturally occurring asbestos increases the risk of developing malignant mesothelioma, according to a study by UC Davis researchers. more

Boosting vitamin C in plants can help reduce smog damage

The harmful effects of smog on people and animals – the stinging eyes and decreased lung capacity – are the stuff of well-researched fact. Now, the body of knowledge about air pollution’s effects on plants has grown with University of California, Riverside Biochemistry Professor Daniel Gallie’s discovery of the importance of vitamin C in helping plants defend themselves against the ravages of ozone – smog’s particularly nasty component. more  

Low heart rate variability in depressed patients contributes to high mortality after heart attack

Scientists have known for years that depression increases the risk of dying in the months after a heart attack, but they haven't understood how depression raises that risk. Now, behavioral medicine specialists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, report in the Archives of Internal Medicine that abnormal heart rate variability is partially responsible for depression's effects in heart patients. more

Cornell breast cancer educator cautions women against using herbal supplements  

Women who take soy or herbal supplements, such as black cohosh, red clover and ginseng, should do so with care, says a Cornell University expert affiliated with the Program on Breast Cancer and Environmental Risk Factors (BCERF) at Cornell, the land-grant institution of New York state. more

U.S. still spends more on health care than any other country 

The United States continues to spend significantly more on health care than any country in the world. In 2002, Americans spent 53 percent per capita more than the next highest country, Switzerland, and 140 percent above the median industrialized country, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study authors analyzed whether two possible reasons—supply constraints and malpractice litigation—could explain the difference in health care costs. They found that neither factor accounted for a large portion of the U.S. spending differential. The study is featured in the July/August 2005 issue of the journal Health Affairs. more

PediPump presents hope for children with heart failure

A new ventricular assist device (VAD) called the PediPump has been developed specifically for use in children. A status report on this new device appears in the July issue of the journal Artificial Organs. more

 

Boosting vitamin C in plants can help reduce smog damage