Volume 7 Issue 199
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 18-Jul-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 19-Jul-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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Compound from Chinese medicine shows promise in head and neck cancer

A compound derived from cottonseed could help improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy at treating head and neck cancer, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found. more  

16-MDCT can efficiently scan ER patients; repositioning patients may improve image quality

Emergency patients who undergo a 16-MDCT examination spend an average of 15 minutes from the time they enter the room to have the CT examination to the time they leave, a new study shows. The study also found that repositioning the patient adds time to the examination, but may improve image quality. more

Has your neighborhood changed over time? New study examines the nationís neighborhoods and segregation

An examination of trends in racial and ethnic residential segregation suggests that African Americans continue to be the most segregated population in the United States. Preliminary findings from the study by Jeffrey Timberlake, assistant professor of sociology, and John Iceland, associate professor of sociology at the University of Maryland, will be presented on Tuesday, July 19, at the International Population Conference in Tours, France, a conference sponsored by the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP). more  

Predicting the outcome of drug-induced liver disease

Drug-induced liver disease (DILD), a potential complication seen with some medications, is usually not life-threatening, but may occasionally be more severe with a high mortality, requiring a liver transplant in selected cases. During the last decade, drug-induced liver injury has led to the withdrawal of a number of drugs from the market. Hy's rule, an observation by the late Dr. Hyman Zimmerman, states that the combination of high liver cell damage as measured by liver enzymes and jaundice induced by a drug is associated with a fatality rate of 10-50 percent. This rule has been advocated by the FDA for assessing the liver toxicity of newly developed drugs, but it has never been scientifically validated. more

Predicting the outcome of drug-induced liver disease  

Drug-induced liver disease (DILD), a potential complication seen with some medications, is usually not life-threatening, but may occasionally be more severe with a high mortality, requiring a liver transplant in selected cases. During the last decade, drug-induced liver injury has led to the withdrawal of a number of drugs from the market. Hy's rule, an observation by the late Dr. Hyman Zimmerman, states that the combination of high liver cell damage as measured by liver enzymes and jaundice induced by a drug is associated with a fatality rate of 10-50 percent. This rule has been advocated by the FDA for assessing the liver toxicity of newly developed drugs, but it has never been scientifically validated. more

Quitting smoking could save your teeth, study shows 

Smokers who give up are much less likely to lose their teeth prematurely than those who don't kick the habit, pioneering research has shown. more

Every second counts for shaken babies

Brisbane researchers are hoping to prove the dangers of shaking babies by creating a model that will show how quickly babies can be injured. more

 

Every second counts for shaken babies