Volume 7 Issue 206
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 25-Jul-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 26-Jul-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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'Achilles' heel' of the herpes virus possibly found

It's one of the most common viruses in America, and one that causes the most guilt and shame. It can get inside almost any kind of human cell, reproduce in vast numbers, and linger for years in the body, causing everything from recurrent genital blisters to sores around the mouth. Its complications can kill, and it may increase susceptibility to many nerve and brain disorders. more  

Unraveling a stomach cancer puzzle

It started several years ago with the observation that a large group of seemingly unconnected genes were behaving differently in patients with stomach cancer. Now a multi-national research team led by the Melbourne Branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR) has joined the proverbial dots and identified a potential new target for stomach cancer therapy, according to a paper published today in the prestigious Nature Medicine journal. more

Inhaling large amounts of salt can cause hypertension

Workers in salt factories, who inhale large amounts of salt particles, are at risk of high blood pressure due to the increased salt intake. A study published today in the Open Access journal Environmental Health shows for the first time that breathing in large quantities of salt particles has just the same effect on blood pressure as eating a salty diet. Wearing face masks and plastic eyeglasses is enough to protect workers who are highly exposed to salt from salt-related high blood pressure. more  

Statins protect from death from pneumonia

Patients hospitalized because of pneumonia are at less risk of dying from the disease if they have been taking the widely used cholesterol-lowering drugs 'statins' before hospital admission. These results, published today in the Open Access journal Respiratory Research, suggest another beneficial use of statins, which are prescribed to an increasing number of patients to prevent and treat high cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease and vascular disease. more

Radioisotope scan patients could trigger security alarms at airports 

People having a scan that involves radioisotopes should be warned that they could set off security radiation alarms in airports for up to 30 days after the procedure, state the authors of a case report in this week’s issue of The Lancet. Richard Underwood (Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK) and colleagues are calling for patients to be issued with an information card after diagnostic or therapeutic procedures involving radioisotopes as standard practice. more

Adverse social circumstances don't always mean poor health  

Across Europe, children from poor families don’t necessarily have worse health than children with more affluent and better educated parents, say researchers in this week’s BMJ. more

Lung cancer deaths in the EU: Declining in men but not women

Among men, lung cancer deaths are now falling in most EU countries, including all new member states from central and eastern Europe, but they are still rising among women, find researchers in this week’s BMJ. more

 

Workers in salt factories, who inhale large amounts of salt particles, are at risk of high blood pressure due to the increased salt intake.