Volume 7 Issue 209
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 28-Jul-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 29-Jul-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Habit leads to learning, new VA/UCSD study shows

Humans have a "robust" capacity to learn and retain new information unconsciously, retaining so-called habit memory even when conscious or declarative learning is absent, memory experts at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the San Diego Veterans Affairs Health System report in the July 28, 2005 issue of Nature. more  

Delirium associated with premature death

Patients who are delirious during hospitalization one year later had 13 percent fewer days of survival during the following year when compared to patients without delirium, according to a study published this month in the Archives of Internal Medicine. more

Researchers make headway in mystery of migraines

Scientists at the MUHC have made progress in understanding what causes migraines. The research, published in the new issue of the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), reveals how gene mutations known to cause a form of inherited migraine--the kind that cause debilitating headaches and light flashes known as auras--target a cellular process involved in brain cell communication. more  

US control of the net may keep poorer parts of the world out and hurt actions against cybercrime

US control of the net may keep poorer parts of the world out and hurt actions against cybercrime, according to a study published in the July 27 issue of JAMA. more

Mechanism proposed for link between RU-486 and fatal infections 

The abortion drug mifepristone (Mifeprex,TM RU-486) has been linked to rare cases of fatal bacterial infections, but until now the connection has not been clearly understood. In "Pathophysiology of mifepristone-induced septic shock due to Clostridium sordellii," author and Brown University professor Ralph P. Miech, MD, PhD, proposes two models of how this devastating reaction may occur. The article appears in The Annals of Pharmacotherapy Online and in the journal's upcoming September print issue. more

Exposure to pesticides in schools produces illnesses among employees, students  

The rate of new illnesses associated with pesticide exposure at schools increased significantly in children from 1998 to 2002, according to an article in the July 27 issue of JAMA. more

Testing shark cartilage as a cancer drug

More than a decade after shark cartilage was first touted as a potential cure for cancer, researchers still do not know whether cartilage has something to offer cancer patients. The best hope for finding out may be a lung cancer study that's testing a drug made from a concentrated extract of shark cartilage. more

 

More than a decade after shark cartilage was first touted as a potential cure for cancer, researchers still do not know whether cartilage has something to offer cancer patients