Volume 7 Issue 227
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 15-Aug-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 16-Aug-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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Emotional, not factual, ads win skeptical consumers, study shows

Consumers who are very skeptical about the truth of advertising claims are more responsive to emotionally appealing ads than ones peppered with information, according to a new study. more  

Young athletes ignore skin cancer risk

Thousands of young athletes are at such high risk for developing skin cancer, a University of Cincinnati (UC) dermatologist says, he dreams of the day "when sunscreen is right up there in the locker room next to the Gatorade." more

Cornell overeating study suggests that how much we eat depends more on external cues, such as portion size, than on biological signals

If you binged for two weeks while on vacation and gained 5 pounds, would you be biologically primed to eat less to compensate and shake off the excess weight? No, suggests a new Cornell University study. more  

Brain tumors may originate with neural stem cells, researchers say

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have determined that stem cells in a certain region of the brain may be the source of a particular type of incurable brain tumor and may be implicated in other types of brain cancers as well. more

Researchers find that combined gene therapy eliminates glioblastoma multiforme in lab studies  

Despite aggressive treatment, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) the most common and deadly of brain cancers usually claims the lives of its victims within six to 12 months of diagnosis. Because GBM is so aggressive, the disease has been the target of a number of laboratory and clinical studies investigating the effectiveness of gene therapy to deliver novel therapies to the brain. In laboratory studies, this type of gene therapy has proved almost completely effective. But in clinical trials, it has had limited effectiveness. more

Drinking alcohol may lower risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing approval of a strengthened distribution program for isotretinoin, called iPLEDGE, aimed at preventing use of the drug during pregnancy. Women who are pregnant or who might become pregnant should not take the drug. Isotretinoin (Accutane and its generics) is a highly effective drug for severe recalcitrant nodular acne, but it carries a significant risk of birth defects if taken during pregnancy. more

FDA announces strengthened risk management program to enhance safe use of isotretinoin (Accutane) for treating severe acne

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing approval of a strengthened distribution program for isotretinoin, called iPLEDGE, aimed at preventing use of the drug during pregnancy. Women who are pregnant or who might become pregnant should not take the drug. Isotretinoin (Accutane and its generics) is a highly effective drug for severe recalcitrant nodular acne, but it carries a significant risk of birth defects if taken during pregnancy. more

 

FDA is announcing approval of a strengthened distribution program for Accutane called iPLEDGE. iPledge is aimed at preventing use of the Accutane during pregnancy.