Volume 7 Issue 237
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 25-Aug-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 26-Aug-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Rate of cellular energy production lower in persons at risk for type 2 diabetes

The rate of insulin-stimulated energy production is significantly reduced in the muscles of lean, healthy young adults who have already developed insulin resistance and are at increased risk of developing diabetes later in life, according to a Yale School of Medicine study. more  

Neurotransmitter orexin associated with pleasure and reward pathways in the brain

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered that the recently identified neurotransmitter orexin (also known as hypocretin) influences reward processing by activating neurons in the lateral hypothalamus region of the brain. By identifying the relationship between orexin neurons and behaviors associated with reward seeking, drug relapse, and addiction, researchers hope to find new treatments for drug addiction. more

New research suggests heart bypass surgery increases risk of Alzheimer's disease

Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers have discovered that patients who have either coronary artery bypass graft surgery or coronary angioplasty are at an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. more  

New portable device captures pictures beneath the living brain's surface

Researchers at Stanford University have demonstrated a promising, minimally invasive optical technique that can capture micron-scale images from deep in the brains of live subjects. The method, called two-photon microendoscopy, combines a pair of powerful optical and mechanical techniques into one device that fits in the palm of the hand. The results appear in the September 1, 2005 issue of Optics Letters, a journal published by the Optical Society of America. more

New type of rejection blocker protects kidneys after transplant  

In an international clinical trial, a new drug that selectively blocks immune responses has proved as effective in preventing acute kidney transplant rejection as cyclosporine, the standard anti-rejection treatment. more

Antibiotics may not be enough to stop recurrent gastric lymphoma caused by Helicobacter pylori 

Research led by Dr. Anne Mueller at Stanford University School of Medicine demonstrates that successful eradication of Helicobacter may not prevent future aggressive gastric lymphoma since resting B cells are left behind. The paper by Mueller et al., "The role of antigenic drive and tumor-infiltrating accessory cells in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter-induced MALT lymphoma," appears in the September issue of The American Journal of Pathology. more

FDA clears genetic test that advances personalized medicine test helps determine safety of drug therapy

Today, FDA cleared for marketing a new blood test that will help doctors make personalized drug treatment decisions for some patients. The Invader UGT1A1 Molecular Assay detects variations in a gene that affects how certain drugs are broken down and cleared by the body. Doctors can use this information to help determine the right drug dosage for individual patients, and minimize harmful drug reactions. more

 

The recently identified neurotransmitter orexin (also known as hypocretin) influences reward processing by activating neurons in the lateral hypothalamus region of the brain