Volume 7 Issue 255
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 17-Sep-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 18-Sep-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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Survey finds many Katrina evacuees had chronic health problems and no health insurance

To give voice to people whose lives have been devastated by Hurricane Katrina and the ensuing floods, The Washington Post, the Kaiser Family Foundation, and the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a unique survey of evacuees in shelters in the Houston area. Key health-related findings include that 52% of evacuees report having no health insurance coverage at the time of the hurricane. Of those with coverage, 34% say it is through Medicaid and 16% through Medicare. more  

BRAVE program Help available for children with anxiety

A pioneering University of Queensland (UQ) research project will help children overcome extreme anxiety. more

Study finds overall health and quality of life intact 10 years after stem-cell transplantation

Survivors of stem-cell transplantation for blood cancers can expect to be just about as healthy 10 years later as adults who have never had a transplant, according to a new study by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Research Cancer Center. more  

Genetic testing helps physicians zero in on eye disease

Rapid genetic testing for eye disease is becoming a reality, thanks to a technology developed at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. Scientists have created a first-of-its-kind test on a microchip array that will help physicians hone their diagnoses for patients with the blinding disease known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The screening technique has proven to be reliable and cost-effective. more

UCI neurobiologists find treatment to block memory-related drug cravings  

A novel chemical compound that blocks memory-related drug cravings has the potential to be the basis of new therapies to aid drug-addiction recovery efforts, UC Irvine neurobiologists have found. more

Potential ovarian cancer oncogene offers possibility of predictive test and a novel therapy  

Scientists from Maryland and New Jersey have identified a molecular pathway in mice that makes prostate cells vulnerable to cancer-causing oxygen damage. The pathway, which is also involved in human prostate cancer, may help determine how and whether antioxidants, such as certain vitamins or their products that reverse the damage, can prevent prostate cancer. more

An apple or a pear?

Eating an apple is infinitely better than looking like one, according to experts at the American College of Cardiology (ACC). Humor aside, research has drawn significant links between body shape and heart disease. The American College of Cardiology is hoping to reshape America by highlighting this new health data on World Heart Day. more

 

Are you an apple or a pear?