Volume 7 Issue 257
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 20-Sep-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 21-Sep-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Adult sickle cell drug proves effective in young children

A drug used for the treatment of sickle cell anemia in adults has now been shown to cause significant improvements in very young children with the disorder. The finding is an important one as these young patients are especially vulnerable to serious organ failure and even death at an early age. The study results will be published in the October 1, 2005, issue of Blood, the official journal of the American Society of Hematology. more  

New non-surgical approach showing great promise in the treatment of challenging brain aneurysms

A fender-bender may have saved Douglas Collins' life. A CT scan following the accident discovered Collins, 64, had a brain aneurysm, a weakness in the arterial wall that if ruptured could cause a stroke or death. It was not caused by the accident, but likely could have been a ticking time bomb present for years. The aneurysm was large and previously thought to require open surgery and a lengthy recovery. more

Columbia scientists develop cancer terminator viruses

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center continue to make strides in their work to develop the next generation of effective viral-based therapies for cancer. Two papers about promising research with genetically engineered viruses studied in mice, published today in the journals Cancer Research and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), bring us significantly closer to this objective and the start of clinical trials with these viral-based therapies in cancer patients. more  

One in every hundred Londoners could be crack cocaine users, claim researchers

Researchers believe there could be 46,000 crack cocaine users aged 15-44 in London, suggesting one in every hundred young adult Londoners could be a user. more

Use of antibiotics for acne may increase risk of common infectious illness 

Individuals treated with antibiotics for acne for more than six weeks were more than twice as likely to develop an upper respiratory tract infection within one year as individuals with acne who were not treated with antibiotics, according to an article in the September issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. more

No risk, no fun?  

Tall people are more prepared to take risks than small people, women are more careful than men, and the willingness to take risks markedly decreases with age: these are the findings arrived at by researchers from the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), the University of Bonn and the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW) in Berlin. For their study they evaluated more than 20,000 interviews with people from all over Germany and additionally confirmed the findings by experiment. What is particularly striking is that people who enjoy taking risks are more content with their lives. more

Failure to suppress irrelevant brain activity in Alzheimer disease

Some people close their eyes when they listen to music, others wear earplugs when they read in noisy places. Both serve to block out inappropriate sensory stimulation, something that happens automatically when we concentrate. A study by Alexander Drzezga and colleagues (of the Technical University Munich, Germany) to be published in the international open access journal PLoS Medicine now shows that this focusing process is defective in people with Alzheimer disease (AD). more

 

Researchers believe there could be 46,000 crack cocaine users aged 15-44 in London.