Volume 7 Issue 282
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 24-Oct-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 25-Oct-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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Slacker or sick?

Early nerve damage caused by repetitive strain injuries can trigger "sick worker" syndrome -- characterized by malaise, fatigue and depression, and often mistaken for poor performance, according to a study by Ann Barr, Ph.D., and Mary Barbe, Ph.D., at Temple University's College of Health Professions. The study, "Increase in inflammatory cytokines in median nerves in a rat model of repetitive motion injury," is published this month in the Journal of Neuroimmunology. more  

Positive study results for methylphenidate transdermal system

Shire announced at a major medical meeting in Toronto, Canada, that its investigational methylphenidate transdermal system (MTS) demonstrated statistically significant reductions in the symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and was generally well tolerated in patients aged 6 to 12 in two clinical trials. more

Chemotherapy errors rare, but have potential for serious consequences

About one out of 30 chemotherapy orders at three ambulatory infusion clinics had errors, and one in 50 orders had a serious error, according to a study appearing in the December 1, 2005 issue of Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study, performed at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, found most but not all errors were detected before they reached the patient. None was life-threatening or caused patient harm. Still, an accompanying editorial says the study underscores the need to implement safer controls of drug ordering and dispensing at chemotherapy infusion clinics. more  

Benefits of longer-term tamoxifen use may take years to appear

The survival benefits of longer-term therapy using tamoxifen may take at least nine years to develop, according to a new study published in the December 1, 2005 issue of Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. A long-term study evaluating two versus five-year treatment with tamoxifen in women aged 50 years or older found it took nine years to demonstrate significant survival benefits of the longer-term treatment, and that improvements in survival were observed only in postmenopausal women younger than 55 years and with estrogen receptor (ER) positive tumors. In these patients prolonging tamoxifen to five years was associated with a 44 percent reduction in the risk of death. more

Protein in St. John’s Wort found to suppress HIV-1 gene expression  

A novel protein, p27SJ, extracted from a callus culture of the St. John’s wort plant (Hypericum perforatum) suppresses HIV-1 expression and inhibits its replication, according to researchers at Temple University School of Medicine’s department of neuroscience and Center for Neurovirology (CNV). more

Carbon nanoparticles promote blood-clotting 

Carbon nanoparticles – both those unleashed in the air by engine exhaust and the engineered structures thought to have great potential in medical applications – promote blood-clotting, scientists report in an upcoming edition of the British Journal of Pharmacology. more

Patients with chronic pain don't have to suffer in silence

An estimated 50 million Americans live with persistent pain caused by disease, chronic health conditions, or accidents. Unfortunately, common misperceptions about pain and the medications that treat it often cause consumers to avoid seeking treatment. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) wants consumers to know that safe medication options to alleviate or eliminate pain are readily available and can help patients gain a better quality of life. more

 

Early nerve damage caused by repetitive strain injuries can trigger "sick worker" syndrome -- characterized by malaise, fatigue and depression -- often mistaken for poor performance.