Vidyya Medical News Service
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Volume 7 Issue 30 Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 30-Jan-2005 Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 31-Jan-2005
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African-Americans not getting equal treatment for pain
As if doing the right thing isn't enough, Saint Louis University researchers have found another reason African-Americans and the poor should receive equal medical treatment and compensation for occupational back pain.  more

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Eat healthy - Live close to the supermarket
The closer low-income people live to a supermarket, the more likely they are to choose healthy foods, such as fruit, say Tulane University diet and nutrition researchers in a recently published study.  more

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Early surgical treatment not always necessary for brain hemorrhage
Results of a randomized trial published in today’s issue of The Lancet suggest that early surgery is no better than medical treatment for patients with brain hemorrhage.  more

 


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Link between nicotine and atrial flutter
In a recent animal study, researchers from the Division of Cardiology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, in collaboration with the University of California, Los Angeles, have found that over time, the absorption of nicotine after myocardial infarction (MI) significantly increases the incidence of cardiac fibrosis in canine hearts. This reaction promotes a kind of rapid heart rhythm that has many similarities to typical human atrial flutter, a potentially life-threatening condition that affects approximately a quarter million Americans each year.  more

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Study sheds light on cross-species infection for BSE
A study published early online by The Lancet provides an estimate of the compared efficiency of oral transmission of BSE to cattle and to man.  more

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Doctors under pressure to compromise good health care for athletes
Doctors are repeatedly coming under pressure to compromise principles of good health care when treating athletes, reveals a small preliminary study in the Journal of Medical Ethics. more

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US rates of death, disability from sexual behaviour triple other wealthy nations
The rates of premature death and disability attributable to sexual behaviour in the United States are triple those of other wealthy nations, suggests research in Sexually Transmitted Infections. more

 
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