Volume 7 Issue 303
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 16-Nov-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 17-Nov-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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UC Davis researchers shed new light on how chemotherapy-induced leukemia develops

Topoisomerase II inhibitors are among the most successful chemotherapy drugs used to treat human cancer. But a small percentage of patients treated with these agents recover from their initial malignancy only to develop a second cancer, leukemia. more  

Cardiovascular drug may improve heart failure and help prevent sudden death

Research shows that Carvedilol, a cardiovascular drug, could be useful in reducing cardiac death in high risk patients with prior myocardial infarction and/or heart failure and also in reducing the incidence and/or preventing the occurrence of atrial fibrillation in a number of clinical situations. A review of this research is published in the journal Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology. more

Study uncovers potential biomarker for lupus atherosclerosis

Groundbreaking research reported at the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology indicates that a certain form of the normally "good" high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol linked to cardiovascular health plays a counterproductive role in people with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis, promoting atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and heart disease in many of these individuals. more  

Antidepressants potentially misused in treating adolescents, Stanford study finds

When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration declared in 2004 that certain antidepressants are linked to an increased risk of suicide in adolescents, there was surprisingly little data about how depression was being treated in young patients. Now new research from the Stanford University School of Medicine provides critical documentation of the potential misuse of these medications in the years leading up to the FDA's decision to issue the so-called "black-box" warnings. more

Sperm stem cells closer to being like embryonic stem cells  

New experiments that prevented rat sperm stem cells from changing permanently into sperm have brought researchers one step closer to coaxing such cells to behave like embryonic stem cells, capable of growing into many other types of cells in the body. more

Patients regain cognitive function after radiation for brain tumors  

Patients who suffer from low-grade brain tumors are able to regain normal cognitive function after receiving radiation therapy to shrink their tumor, according to a study published in the November 15, 2005, issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, the official journal of ASTRO, the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. more

Jefferson researchers find lack of protein in obese people is risk factor for kidney, heart disease

Jefferson researchers have found that mice with low levels of the protein hormone adiponectin may also have high levels of a protein called albumin which, in humans, may be a sign of kidney disease. This study provides further support for the theory that kidney disease may be a more important risk factor for heart disease than is cholesterol. more

 

Carvedilol, a cardiovascular drug, could be useful in reducing cardiac death in high risk patients with prior myocardial infarction and/or heart failure and also in reducing the incidence and/or preventing the occurrence of atrial fibrillation in a number of clinical situations.