Volume 7 Issue 305
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 18-Nov-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 19-Nov-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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The cognitive cost of being a twin

Social and economic circumstances do not explain why twins have significantly lower IQ in childhood than single-born children, according to a study in this week's BMJ. more  

One drug tackles two diseases: Prevents bone loss, periodontal disease

Drugs that reverse and prevent bone loss due to osteoporosis also significantly ward off periodontal disease, according to a graduate of the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine who reports in the current Menopause journal article, "Periodontal Assessments of Postmenopausal Women Receiving Risedronate." more

Warning labels on high-risk drugs inconsistently heeded by doctors

In a survey of approximately 930,000 ambulatory care patients, researchers from the Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention (of Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care) and colleagues found that 42 percent received prescriptions for drugs with Black Box Warnings (BBW), the Food and Drug Administration's strongest label for high-risk medication. more  

Gene at heart of bad outcomes in high blood pressure patients

Having high blood pressure and a particular genetic alteration dramatically increases the risk of heart attack, stroke or death, and may explain why some hypertensive patients fare worse than others - even if they take the same medication, University of Florida researchers announced this week. more

Women still at risk of cervical cancer despite treatment removing pre-cancerous cells  

Women who have had pre-cancerous cells removed remain at higher than average risk of developing cervical cancer in the 20 years following treatment, says research in this week's BMJ. more

New study shows patients more willing to consider self-injectable HIV therapy than many physicians anticipate 

Initial results from the OpenMind study, the largest behavioural study to look at both patients' and physicians' perceptions of HIV care in treatment-experienced patients, were revealed today at EACS. The study's findings are anticipated to help physicians implement improved care to HIV patients and help pave the way for better acceptance and integration of other new innovative drugs such as monoclonal antibodies that are increasingly being developed for the management of HIV and other diseases. more

New labelling on foods still not clear enough for allergy sufferers

Safety for people with food allergies will be boosted later this month when new European laws will force manufacturers to label their food more accurately, but the laws do not offer full protection, says an editorial in this week's BMJ. more

 

At age seven, the average IQ score for twins was 5.3 points lower than that for single-born children of the same family, and 6.0 points lower at age nine.