Volume 7 Issue 314
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 28-Nov-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 29-Nov-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Widespread media coverage contributes to rapid decline in HRT prescribing

Researchers have identified an enzyme crucial to the malaria parasite's invasion of red blood cells, according to a study in the open-access journal, PLoS Pathogens. more  

Studying brain activity could aid diagnosis of social phobia

People suffering generalised social phobia experience increased brain activity when confronted with threatening faces or frightening social situations, new research shows. more

Study links progressive aphasia syndrome to prion gene

Most people with a rare type of dementia called primary progressive aphasia (PPA) have a specific combination of prion gene variants, a new study shows. The study is the first to link the prion protein gene to this disorder. It was funded in part by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and appears in the December 2005 issue of the Annals of Neurology. more  

Brain structure associated with fear inhibition also may influence personality

The relationship between the size of a brain structure and the ability to recover from traumatic experiences also may influence overall personality type, according to a study from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers. In a followup to earlier findings that an area of the brain called the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) appears thicker in those who can better control their emotional response to unpleasant memories, the investigators found that study participants who exhibited better fear inhibition also score higher in measures of extraversion an energetic, outgoing personality. The report appears in the Nov. 28 issue of NeuroReport. more

Obesity prevents injections from reaching muscle  

Women may not be getting the most out of vaccines and other injections, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). more

No risk of heart attack associated with short-term use of traditional painkillers 

Short-term use of painkiller drugs in the same family as ibuprofen does not increase the risk of having a heart attack. more

Aspirin may help the heart, but one in ten patients will also develop an ulcer, new research shows

Aspirin has long been hailed as one of the most effective, low-cost ways to help guard against a heart attack or stroke. However, international medical researchers caution that low doses of aspirin also increase a patient's chance of developing an ulcer, often without warning signs. more

 

Researchers caution that low doses of aspirin also increase a patient's chance of developing an ulcer