Volume 7 Issue 315
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 30-Nov-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 1-Dec-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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New antibody shows promise as cure for anthrax

A new anthrax antibody engineered by scientists at The University of Texas at Austin protects and defends against inhalation anthrax without the use of antibiotics and other more expensive antibodies. more  

Emergency bypass surgery on angioplasty patients drops 90 percent

When life-threatening problems occur during angioplasty procedures, doctors may perform emergency coronary artery bypass graft surgery, but data from the Mayo Clinic indicates that need to send patients to emergency surgery has dropped sharply, according to a new study in the Dec. 6, 2005, issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. more

Increasing role of acetaminophen in acute liver failure in the United States

"Acetaminophen poisoning has become the most common cause of acute liver failure in the United States," report the authors of a new study in the December 2005 issue of Hepatology, the official journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD). While attempted suicides still account for many cases, almost half are the result of unintentional overdose. more  

Are women tougher when it comes to heart disease? Study suggests yes

Women with heart problems may be "tougher" about their disease than their male counterparts, a new University of Michigan study suggests. And that difference may help explain why they're less likely to get aggressive care for the No. 1 killer of both women and men. more

Less-invasive ultrafiltration device may be practical alternative to diuretics  

A device that performs ultrafiltration of blood, without requiring specialized nursing care or invasive central intravenous access, can reduce fluid overload in patients with congestive heart failure, according to a new study in the Dec. 6, 2005, issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. more

A tight skirt can make a smart manager look dumb 

Past research has shown that physical attractiveness helps people get ahead. A study published in the latest issue of Psychology of Women Quarterly examines this issue further to find that a sexy self-presentation (i.e. high-heels, a tight skirt, and low-cut blouse) harmed businesswomen. more

Two landmark papers on amputation prevention in diabetes unveiled

Every 30 seconds a limb is lost to diabetes. This is the backdrop for two major studies reported in the November 12, 2005, issue of Lancet by Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Sciences' Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research (CLEAR). more

 

Women are tougher when it comes to heart disease. Women who had major problems related to their heart disease were just as likely to rate their disease as "mild to moderate" as men with far less-severe problems.