Volume 7 Issue 321
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 6-Dec-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 7-Dec-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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Research: autistic children’s brains grow larger during first years of development, why is not clear

By age 2, children with the often-devastating neurological condition physicians call autism show a generalized enlargement of their brains, a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University medical schools study concludes. more  

Sooner is better with cochlear implants, Stanford scientist shows

Cochlear implants allow the deaf to hear. Their brains learn to understand the artificial electrical stimulation that the implants provide to the cochlea as sound. A Stanford neurobiologist teamed with child-development specialists at the University of Maryland to see if children with cochlear implants were able to meld their newly acquired hearing capability with their ability to read lips. In other words, did their brains process speech the same way as people who are born with the ability to hear? more

Modified Atkins diet effectively treats childhood seizures

A modified version of a popular low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet is nearly as effective at controlling seizures as the highly restrictive ketogenic diet, Johns Hopkins Children's Center researchers report. more  

Mayo Clinic researchers: Stroke risk significant in month following heart attack

"While our research reaffirmed the risk of stroke among patients with heart disease, the surprise was that the risk was so high in the month after a heart attack," says Veronique Roger, M.D., M.P.H., the Mayo Clinic cardiologist who led the study. more

'Survival' genes hold key to healthy brains in babies and the elderly  

Completing a daily crossword and enjoying a range of activities and interests has long been accepted as a recipe for maintaining a healthy brain in older age, but the reasons for this have never been clear. Now, scientists at the University of Edinburgh are seeking to identify brain's 'survival' genes which lie dormant in unused brain cells, but are re-awakened in active brain cells. These awakened genes make the brain cells live longer and resist traumas such as disease, stroke and the effects of drugs, and are also critical to brain development in unborn babies. more

Evidence for expanded color vision for some colorblind individuals 

Some forms of colorblindness may actually afford enhanced perception of some colors, according to findings reported this week in Current Biology by John Mollon and colleagues at the University of Cambridge. more

Preclinical study of a new brain tumor therapy

Scientists have devised a strategy to treat tumors by selectively targeting and killing the malignant cells. A new preclinical study, published in the open access journal PLoS Medicine, has applied the approach to combat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This is the most aggressive form of brain tumour, growing very quickly before symptoms are experienced and killing most patients within a year of diagnosis. more

 

Some forms of colorblindness may actually afford enhanced perception of some colors.