Volume 7 Issue 323
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 8-Dec-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 9-Dec-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Trust-building hormone short-circuits fear in humans

A brain chemical recently found to boost trust appears to work by reducing activity and weakening connections in fear-processing circuitry, a brain imaging study at the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has discovered. Scans of the hormone oxytocin's effect on human brain function reveal that it quells the brain's fear hub, the amygdala, and its brainstem relay stations in response to fearful stimuli. more  

Acne, milk and the iodine connection

Dermatologists seem to agree that something in milk and dairy products may be linked to teen-age acne. more

How seizures progress to epilepsy in the young

A major mystery in epilepsy research has been why infants are more prone to seizures than adults and how those seizures progress to chronic epilepsy. Now, researchers have discovered that central to those seizures in the developing brain are neurons triggered by the neurotransmitter GABA. They say their findings could lead to new ways to treat seizures in newborns. Also, they say, their findings suggest that the use of drugs that enhance GABA action may be particularly harmful to the newborn brain. more  

Massive amounts of lead in bone fragments belonging to 19th Century composer Ludwig von Beethoven

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have found massive amounts of lead in bone fragments belonging to 19th Century composer Ludwig von Beethoven, confirming the cause of his years of chronic debilitating illness. more

Bayer launches Phase III clinical study of Trasylol in elective spinal fusion surgery  

Bayer Pharmaceuticals Corporation today announced the initiation of a Phase III clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Trasylol® (aprotinin injection) in reducing blood loss and the need for transfusion in adult patients undergoing elective spinal fusion surgery. more

Nutritional genomics identifies a potential weight-loss resistance gene 

Two obese people follow the same low-calorie diet and do not exercise, but one loses much more weight than the other. Genetic factors may explain this phenomenon, according to José Ordovas, PhD, director of the Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts University. In a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Ordovas and colleagues identified a variation in the perilipin gene that appears to render some people resistant to weight loss from calorie restriction. This research builds on their earlier work on perilipin and obesity. more

Performing monkeys in Asia carry viruses that could jump species to humans

Some urban performing monkeys in Indonesia are carrying several retroviruses that are capable of infecting people, according to a new study led by University of Washington researchers. The results indicate that contact with performing monkeys, which is common in many Asian countries, could represent a little-known path for viruses to jump the species barrier from monkeys to humans and eventually cause human disease. Performing monkeys are animals that are trained to produce tricks in public. more

 

Since the 1960s, dermatologists have found evidence that iodine intake exacerbates acne. Nevertheless, various studies have shown there is still a significant level of iodine in milk in several countries, including the U.S., Britain, Denmark, Norway and Italy.