Volume 7 Issue 328
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 13-Dec-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 14-Dec-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Four questions that may save your grandma's life: SNAQ screening tool predicts weight loss

A four-question screening tool can predict which older patients with appetite problems are likely to lose weight, placing them at greater risk of death, according to Saint Louis University research. more  

Chronic disability in older Americans greatly overestimated

The rates of chronic disability in older Americans has been substantially overestimated by about forty percent, researchers at Yale School of Medicine report in the December 12 Archives of Internal Medicine. more

Infections are a major cause of childhood cancer, study suggests

Results from a new study of childhood cancer statistics provide further evidence that common infections affecting mother and baby could play a key role in triggering certain types of the disease. more  

New studies identify advances in treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

Offering promise in the battle against cancer, the results from five studies highlighting new advances in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) a slow-progressing, malignant bone marrow cancer will be presented at the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology. more

Hearing loss from chemotherapy underestimated 

By 14, Peter Johnson had survived brain cancer and a relapse of the disease in his shoulder. But it was treatment for the last tumor that would create his life's greatest challenges. more

Immunosuppressive drug appears effective in reducing new brain lesions in MS patients  

A medication that reduces relapse rates in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) appears to be effective in reducing new brain inflammatory lesions and is well tolerated, according to a study in the December issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. more

Drinking tea associated with lower risk of ovarian cancer

Women who drank at least two cups of tea a day had a lower risk of ovarian cancer than those who did not drink tea, according to a study in the December 12/26 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. more

 

There appears to be a 46 percent lower risk of ovarian cancer in women who drank two or more cups of tea per day compared with non-drinkers