Volume 7 Issue 329
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 14-Dec-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 15-Dec-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Mayo clinic reports some chronic leukemia patients may improve by taking an extract of green tea

A new case study by Mayo Clinic researchers provides preliminary evidence to suggest a component of green tea may lead to clinical improvement in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Findings are published online in Leukemia Research. more  

Growth factor protects brain against damage from stroke; Finding could lead to the development of new stroke treatments

A naturally occurring growth factor called neuregulin-1 protects brain cells from damage resulting from stroke, according to an animal study conducted by researchers at Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) and the Atlanta-based Center for Behavioral Neuroscience (CBN). The finding, reported in the online edition of Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, could lead to the development of new stroke treatments. more

New antidepressant drug increases 'brain's own cannabis'

Researchers have discovered a new drug that raises the level of endocannabinoids--the 'brain's own cannabis'--providing anti-depressant effects. The new research published in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), suggests the new drug, called URB597, could represent a safer alternative to cannabis for the treatment of pain and depression, and open the door to new and improved treatments for clinical depression--a condition that affects around 20% of Canadians. more  

Common alternative treatment for liver disease is found to be ineffective

Results of high-quality randomized clinical trials have determined that milk thistle extract, a widely used alternative medication, may not have any significant influence on the course of patients with alcoholic liver disease or hepatitis B or C liver disease. These findings are published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. more

New study finds anabolic steroids may be addictive  

A new study designed to test whether androgenic-anabolic steroids may be addictive found that hamsters exposed to the compounds demonstrated addictive behavior over time. The research, conducted by the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine was released at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology's (ACNP) annual conference. more

New study finds common herbal supplement helps to reduce cocaine cravings 

A new study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) suggests that a common over-the-counter herbal supplement can reduce the cravings associated with chronic cocaine use. This research, released at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology's (ACNP) annual conference is among the first to identify N-acetylcysteine (NAC) as a potential agent to modulate the effects of cocaine addiction. There is also early evidence in animal models of addiction to suggest that this chemical works similarly in the treatment of heroin addiction, and possibly alcoholism. more

OHSU discovery sheds light into how stem cells become brain cells

Researchers at the Oregon National Primate Research Center at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) have discovered one key gene that appears to control how stem cells become various kinds of brain cells. The finding has significant implications for the study of Parkinson's disease, brain and spinal cord injury, and other conditions or diseases that might be combated by replacing lost or damaged brain cells. The research is published in the current online edition of the medical journal Developmental Biology. more

 

Researchers have discovered a new drug that raises the level of endocannabinoids--the 'brain's own cannabis'--providing anti-depressant effects.