Volume 7 Issue 331
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 16-Dec-2005 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 17-Dec-2005

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Traditional risk-factor scoring misses one-third of women vulnerable to coronary heart disease

Traditional risk-factor scoring fails to identify approximately one-third of women likely to develop coronary heart disease (CHD), the leading cause of death of women in the United States, according to a pair of reports from cardiologists at Johns Hopkins. more  

Boys more likely when pregnancy takes longer

The longer it takes to get pregnant, the more chance there is of having a boy, finds a study in this week's BMJ. more

New study identifies louse-borne diseases that ravaged Napoleon's army

Using dental pulp extracted from the teeth of soldiers who died during Napoleon's disastrous retreat through Russia in 1812, a new study finds DNA evidence that epidemic typhus and trench fever ran rampant among the French Grand Army. The study, published in the Jan. 1 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, now available online, identifies the specific species of louse-borne pathogens that were a major cause of death among the remains of the retreating army. more  

Nearly a quarter of children are especially susceptible to respiratory illness if they are exposed to second-hand smoke

Children with a certain genetic makeup are at heightened risk of chest infections and other respiratory illnesses due to second-hand smoke exposure, according to researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. more

Fish oil prevents potentially deadly heart rate variability 

A two-gram fish oil supplement given daily to elderly persons prevented a decline in heart rate variability caused by tiny, dangerous airborne pollutant particles. Heart rate variability, a measure of the autonomic nervous system's regulation of the heart, is an independent risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias, heart attack or sudden death. more

How Rickettsial pathogens break into cells  

New research by a team of scientists in France and the United States has identified both the bacterial and host receptor proteins that enable Rickettsia conorii, the Mediterranean spotted fever pathogen to enter cells. Understanding how this bacterium interacts with the cells of its host could lead to new therapeutic strategies for diseases caused by related pathogens, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever and typhus. more

Engineered stem cells show promise for sneaking drugs into the brain

One of the great challenges for treating Parkinson's diseases and other neurodegenerative disorders is getting medicine to the right place in the brain. more

 

Among the 498 women who took longer than 12 months to get pregnant, the probability of male offspring was nearly 58%