Volume 8 Issue 10
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 10-Jan-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 11-Jan-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Mental stress may lead to heart disease

Most people believe that stress plays a role in heart disease. A study published in the latest issue of Psychophysiology finds that large rises in blood pressure during mental stress are associated with higher levels of activity in the regions of the brain associated with experiencing negative emotions and generating physiological responses in the rest of the body. The research suggests that exaggerated activity in the cingulate cortex during mental stress may generate excessive rises in blood pressure that may place some individuals at a greater risk for heart disease. more  

15 percent work under influence of alcohol

Workplace alcohol use and impairment directly affects an estimated 15 percent of the U.S. workforce, or 19.2 million workers, according to a recent study conducted at the University at Buffalo's Research Institute on Addictions (RIA) and reported in the current issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol. more

Tumor cells that border normal tissue are told to leave

The thin, single-cell boundary where a tumor meets normal tissue is the most dangerous part of a cancer according to a new study by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The researchers found that tumor cells bordering normal tissue receive signals that tell them to wander away from the tumor, allowing the cancer cells to establish deadly metastatic tumors elsewhere in the body. more  

Three-week diet/exercise study shows 50 percent reversal in metabolic syndrome, Type 2 diabetes

Obese and overweight individuals suffering metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes showed significant health improvements after only three weeks of diet and moderate exercise even though the participants remained overweight. more

Newer football helmet design may reduce incidence of concussions in high school players 

Newer football helmet technology and design may reduce the incidence of concussions in high school football players, according to results from the first phase of a three-year study by the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's (UPMC) Sports Medicine Concussion Program. more

Screening for prostate cancer may not reduce men's risk of death  

Screening men for prostate cancer may not reduce their risk for dying, according to a new study in the January 9 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. more

Trusted head injury prevention technique debunked

Contrary to popular thinking in athletics, traditional neck muscle resistance training may not protect athletes from head injuries. more

 

New football helmet design may decrease concussions among high school football players.