Volume 8 Issue 101
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 11-Apr-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 12-Apr-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Novel device shows great potential in detecting oral cancer

Researchers supported by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, report today their initial success using a customized optical device that allows dentists to visualize in a completely new way whether a patient might have a developing oral cancer. more  

Study shows more than half of esophageal cancer patients now survive

In part because the nature of the disease has changed, nearly 50 percent of patients with esophageal cancer that undergo an advanced surgical procedure now survive for five years, not 20 percent as once thought, according to an article published in the April edition of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center contend that earlier diagnoses, more widespread screening and individualized care have made surgery by far the best way to combat esophageal cancer as it is most often diagnosed today. more

Statewide study reveals new data on risks and consequences of seatbelt non-use

In the nation's first statewide study of its kind, the Injury Research Center of the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee has revealed new data on an old problem… people who don't use seatbelts. The researchers found that unbelted crash occupants who make it to an emergency department alive are more than three times as likely as belt users to die. more  

Chronic pain hurts both workers and employers, says FSU professor

Chronic pain, which is any physical discomfort lasting for at least six months, affects up to 50 million Americans, most of whom work full time. Common forms of chronic pain include headaches, backaches, arthritis, respiratory conditions, and ailments caused by sports injuries or other traumas, such as car accidents. more

Hopkins-led clinical study shows brain's reaction to 'uppers' determined by gender 

Discovery could lead to more effective treatments for amphetamine abuse and brain disease Results from a government-funded study at Johns Hopkins provide what is believed to be the first evidence in people that amphetamines have a greater effect on men's brains than women's -- a discovery that could lead to tailored treatments for drug abuse and neurological diseases. more

Nano-particles effective in killing cancer with one-two punch of chemotherapeutics  

Research studies, based at the University of Pennsylvania, demonstrate that biodegradable nano-particles containing two potent cancer-fighting drugs are effective in killing human breast tumors. The unique properties of the hollow shell nano-particles, known as polymersomes, allow them to deliver two distinct drugs, paclitaxel, the leading cancer drug known by brand names such as Taxol, and doxorubicin directly to tumors implanted in mice. Their findings, presented online in the journal Molecular Pharamaceutics, illustrate the broad clinical potential of polymersomes. more

Big hips, big belly? It's in your genes, Joslin-led study shows

Do you have big hips or a "beer" belly? Are you "apple-shaped" or "pear-shaped"? It makes a difference, since we know that abdominal obesity is linked to diabetes and many other metabolic conditions, i.e., the metabolic syndrome. What's new is that, according to a new study led by researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, both obesity and body shape seem to be controlled by important genes that are part of the mechanisms regulating normal development. more

 

Obesity and body shape seem to be controlled by important genes that are part of the mechanisms regulating normal development.