Volume 8 Issue 106
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 16-Apr-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 17-Apr-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Understanding cell death may bring new life to kidney treatment

Finding how two proteins conspire to get kidney cells to self-destruct when oxygen supplies are low may one day improve dismal mortality rates for ischemic renal failure, researchers say. more  

Bioactive cement scaffold may improve bone grafts

A new technology for implants that may improve construction or repair of bones in the face, skull and jaw, has been developed by researchers from the American Dental Association Foundation (ADAF) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). more

Unraveling the mysteries of poison

Researchers from the Max Planck Institite for Biophysical Chemistry and other German and French colleagues have combined magnetic resonance spectroscopy (solid-state NMR) with special protein synthesis procedures to uncover how potassium channels and toxins combine and change in structure. This work could make it possible to develop medications for high blood pressure and many other diseases connected to potassium channel failure (Nature, 13 April 2006). more  

Therapeutic prospects beyond Vioxx

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have clarified the mechanism by which drugs like Celebrex and Vioxx cause heart problems, in multiple animal models. The findings offer the prospect of a new generation of anti-inflammatory drugs that bypass this issue, as reported in the April 13 advanced online edition and May print issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation. more

Lack of basic research putting patients at risk 

Patients are suffering because not enough basic clinical research is being done, warns a senior doctor in this week's BMJ. He believes that medical academia is failing patients and clinicians by neglecting this vital area of research. more

Soil-bound prions that cause CWD remain infectious  

Madison -Scientists have confirmed that prions, the mysterious proteins thought to cause chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer, latch on tightly to certain minerals in soil and remain infectious. more

Gene variant associated with obesity risk found with new statistical technique

A pioneering statistical technique developed at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) has helped identify a common gene variation associated with an increased risk for obesity. The finding, which has been replicated in four other samples of children and of adults of European and African ancestry, provides an unusually strong association between a gene variant and a complex disease in the field of association mapping. more

 

A pioneering statistical technique developed at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) has helped identify a common gene variation associated with an increased risk for obesity.