Volume 8 Issue 114
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 24-Apr-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 25-Apr-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Non-smokers with lung cancer respond better to treatment than smokers, study says

Smoking history contributes to poor outcomes in the treatment of lung cancer, according to a new study. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lung cancer patients who have never smoked before in their life have better overall survival rates and respond better to chemotherapy than current or former smokers. Published in the June 1, 2006 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also reveals that smoking status during treatment has no affect on clinical outcome. more  

Many breast cancer survivors not getting recommended mammograms

A new study finds use of annual mammography among breast cancer survivors, who are at increased risk of a recurrence or a new malignancy in the other breast, dropped off after a few years. During the five year study period, only one in three women in this high-risk population had received regular annual mammograms. Published in the June 1, 2006 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study reveals the most significant factors predicting who got screened included being seen by a gynecologist or primary care physician and having been treated with breast conserving surgery. more

Male rivalry increases when females at most fertile, say researchers

Men become more jealous of dominant males when their female partner is near ovulation, researchers at the University of Liverpool have found. more  

Cancer cells suppress large regions of DNA by a reversible process that can be tackled

Cancer researchers at Sydney's Garvan Institute, in collaboration with Spanish scientists, have formulated a new concept for how cancer cells can escape normal growth controls, which may have far-reaching implications for the new generation of cancer therapies. more

Newly discovered protein kills anthrax bacteria by exploding their cell walls  

Not all biological weapons are created equal. They are separated into categories A through C, category A biological agents being the scariest: They are easy to spread, kill effectively and call for special actions by the pubic health system. more

Immune culprit in malaria-associated anemia  

Scientists have found that a protein produced by immune cells during malaria infection triggers severe anemia, a lethal complication of the disease. Richard Bucala and colleagues at Yale University (New Haven, CT) show that immune cells in mice with malaria secrete a protein called MIF, which decreases the production of red blood cells (RBCs) from the bone marrow. more

Concern over rising preterm births

Doctors in this week’s BMJ express concern over the apparent increase in preterm births. more

 

Smoking history contributes to poor outcomes in the treatment of lung cancer.