Volume 8 Issue 117
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 27-Apr-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 28-Apr-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

HONcode accreditation seal. We subscribe to the HONcode principles.
Verify here
.

  

 


Herb in tests to stop breast cancer patients' hot flashes and night sweats

Researchers at the University of Manchester are testing a secret herb in a bid to stop the severe hot flushes that besiege breast cancer patients on hormone treatment. more  

Immune response to HIV in the brain

Using multi-disciplinary analysis that included cognitive, neurophysiologic, virologic, and molecular techniques, the team found both a low-level viral infection in the brain and immune cells that had infiltrated the brain in order to protect against the virus. more

Study may explain why exercise helps heart failure patients

Aerobic training is associated with a reversal of abnormal hormonal patterns that underlie many of the debilitating symptoms of heart failure, according to a new study in the 2 May 2006 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. more  

Novel stem cell technology leads to better spinal cord repair

Researchers believe they have identified a new way, using an advance in stem-cell technology, to promote recovery after spinal cord injury of rats, according to a study published in today's Journal of Biology. more

Cure for cancer worth $50 trillion 

A new study, to be published in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Political Economy, calculates the prospective gains that could be obtained from further progress against major diseases. Kevin M. Murphy and Robert H. Topel, two University of Chicago researchers, estimate that even modest advancements against major diseases would have a significant impact a 1 percent reduction in mortality from cancer has a value to Americans of nearly $500 billion. A cure for cancer would be worth about $50 trillion. more

Hormone found to decrease appetite and increase activity  

New research shows how topping up the levels of a hormone found in the gut could help reduce the appetite and increase activity in overweight and obese people. more

New drug could reduce tissue damage after heart attack

A study led by UCL (University College London) scientists has designed a new drug that inhibits the adverse effects of C reactive protein (CRP), a protein that contributes to tissue damage in heart attacks and strokes. The findings, published in the journal Nature, suggest that targeting CRP may produce both immediate and long-term clinical benefits following a heart attack. more

 

Researchers estimate a 1 percent reduction in mortality from cancer has a value to Americans of nearly $500 billion. A cure for cancer would be worth about $50 trillion.