Volume 8 Issue 118
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 28-Apr-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 29-Apr-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Feinstein researchers identify intelligence gene

Psychiatric researchers at The Zucker Hillside Hospital campus of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have uncovered evidence of a gene that appears to influence intelligence. Working in conjunction with researchers at Harvard Partners Center for Genetics and Genomics in Boston, the Zucker Hillside team examined the genetic blueprints of individuals with schizophrenia, a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by cognitive impairment, and compared them with healthy volunteers. more  

Chamomile tea and lotion causing internal bleeding in patient on anti-coagulant medication

Researchers at the MUHC in Montreal have documented a severe case of internal hemorrhaging in a patient that drank chamomile tea and used chamomile lotion while taking anti-coagulant medication for a heart condition. The 70-year old patient was admitted to the MUHC ER in Montreal after using chamomile to help soothe her sore throat. The case published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) this week, highlights the need for caution when taking alternative (natural) therapies while on physician prescribed medications. more

Blood clots may hold key to treating dementia

Spontaneous blood clots or debris from arterial disease in the brain (known as cerebral emboli) may hold the key to preventing or treating dementia, say researchers from the University of Manchester in this week's BMJ. more  

Hormonal male contraception reversible after few months for all men

With hormonal male contraception likely to be available in the near future, results of a study in this week's issue of THE LANCET highlight how such contraception is reversible within a few months. more

African American men paradoxically have fewer, less severe coronary obstructions than white males 

While African American men are more likely to die from cardiovascular disease, they paradoxically have fewer cases of coronary obstruction than clinically similar white men, according to a new national study led by a Medical College of Wisconsin researcher. The study results, to appear in the May 16 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, will be presented on April 27 at the American Medical Association's science news briefing in New York. more

Patients at greater risk if mother has coronary heart disease  

If your mother has coronary heart disease (CHD), you may want to make an extra effort to combat your personal risk, according to a study in the June issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Findings indicate maternal transmission of CHD is stronger than paternal transmission and transmission is even stronger if both parents have the disease. more

FDA approves first generic Pravastatin

The Food and Drug Administration today approved the first generic version of Bristol-Myers Squibb's Pravachol (Pravastatin Sodium Tablets), an important step in the agency's effort to increase the availability of lower-cost generic medications. more

 

While African American men are more likely to die from cardiovascular disease, they paradoxically have fewer cases of coronary obstruction than clinically similar white men.