Volume 8 Issue 120
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 30-Apr-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 1-May-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
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NCI releases report on cancer incidence in Middle East

Training pediatricians to recognize the signs of aggression and make a referral to an appropriate community organization may help prevent future violence. However, providers donít often do this, according to a new study by a pediatrician at Brenner Childrenís Hospital, part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. more  

Survey: Significant number of young men use EDM medications

A new study indicates a high prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and evidence of recreational use of erectile dysfunction medications (EDM) among adolescents and young men. more

Adolescents do not see health care providers often enough to receive human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV)

Most adolescents currently do not see their health care providers often enough to receive the series of shots for the human papillomavirus vaccine, according to preliminary research from the University of Rochester Medical Center. However, the additional visits required would give physicians and nurses the opportunity to provide more preventive and other care. more  

Adults expose children to significant health risks by using tobacco at home

While a growing majority of Americans favor smoking restrictions in public places, many adults still expose their children to significant health risks by puffing tobacco at home, a Mississippi State University researcher reports. more

Mothers often have inaccurate perceptions of their children's body weight, study shows 

Latina mothers of preschool-aged children frequently have inaccurate perceptions of their children's body mass index and believe they are healthy when they are overweight, according to a new study from the University of California, San Francisco. more

FDA approves first treatment for pompe disease  

The Food and Drug Administration today approved a biologics license application (BLA) for Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa, rhGAA), the first treatment for patients with Pompe disease, a rare but severely debilitating disease. Pompe disease, which affects one in 40,000-300,000 individuals, drastically reduces a person's muscle and respiratory function. Myozyme had been granted FDA Orphan Drug designation and was approved under a priority review. Orphan products are developed to treat rare diseases or conditions that affect fewer than 200,000 people in the U.S. The Orphan Drug Act provides a seven-year period of exclusive marketing to the first sponsor who obtains marketing approval for a designated orphan drug. more

Pompe disease information page

Pompe disease is a rare genetic disorder caused by a deficiency in the enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA), which is needed to break down glycogen, a stored form of sugar used for energy. The build-up of glycogen causes progressive muscle weakness throughout the body and affects various body tissues, particularly in the heart, skeletal muscles, liver, and nervous system. more

 

Latina mothers of preschool-aged children frequently have inaccurate perceptions of their children's body mass index.