Volume 8 Issue 125
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 5-May-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 6-May-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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H5N1 threat puts human flu back in spotlight

The emergence of the avian influenza virus H5N1 that is currently devastating chicken flocks in many countries and threatening to unleash a worldwide epidemic among humans has triggered a renewed interest among scientists in studying influenza A viruses, according to investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. This renewed interest could lead to new discoveries of immune system response to viruses that could lead to better drugs and vaccines, the researchers write in a review article that appears in the May issue of Nature Immunology. more  

Stomach receptor for H. pylori discovered

Scientists have determined that decay-accelerating factor (DAF), a protein found in epithelial cells in the stomach, acts as a receptor for the bacteria Helicobacter pylori. Blocking this interaction could lead to new drugs that reduce the risk of peptic ulcer disease or gastric cancer. The research appears as the "Paper of the Week" in the May 12 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, an American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology journal. more

Breast conservation a good option for non-invasive, 'early' breast cancer, U-M study shows

For women diagnosed with a type of non-invasive breast cancer, removing the breast is not the only treatment option. Breast conserving surgery, long known to be successful at treating the more common invasive cancer, can also be effective for this pre-invasive condition, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. more  

Expanding waistlines triggered by your genes

A gene that degrades the body's collagen infrastructure has been shown to make fat cells fatter and expand girth. more

Halting histamine action means hallelujah for hay fever sufferers 

In allergic diseases such as asthma, hay fever, and rhinitis an allergen stimulates the release of antibodies that attach themselves to mast cells causing these cells to release histamine, which can cause symptoms like itching of the nose, skin and eyes, sneezing, and wheezing. more

Ongoing hassles at work are a real threat to health because they can raise blood pressure over the long term -- right?  

While no one disagrees that a fight with the boss can send blood pressure skywards for an hour or so, the most comprehensive review of the literature on the subject ever conducted finds little evidence that day-to-day work woes affect chronic blood pressure, one way or the other. more

Ethnic differences in risks of adverse reactions to drugs used in cardiovascular medicine

Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important cause of ill health and death. Several factors including genetic make up, age, sex, and even diet, can all alter a patientís susceptibility to ADRs. But it is not known to what extent susceptibility to ADRs might depend on ethnic group, whether as a result of genetic or cultural factors. more

 

While no one disagrees that a fight with the boss can send blood pressure skywards for an hour or so, the most comprehensive review of the literature on the subject ever conducted finds little evidence that day-to-day work woes affect chronic blood pressure.