Volume 8 Issue 131
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 11-May-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 12-May-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Scientists unlock more secrets of HIV and SARS

UK scientists have cracked one of the key biological processes used by viruses such as HIV and SARS when they replicate according to a paper published in the journal Nature tomorrow (11 May). Viruses are able to interfere with the host cell processes that our bodies use to replicate cells, and protein synthesis is often one of their targets. For the first time, researchers at the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford have witnessed virus-induced "frameshifting" in action and have been able to identify the crucial role of particular elements. more  

Affairs of the heart matter to boys, too, sociologists find

Teenage boys have feelings, too, and when it comes to matters of the heart, they may not be so fleeting after all. Not far beneath the bravado often on display is an unsure adolescent who finds it hard to express emotions that, while new, are nonetheless often sincerely felt. more

Victims of rape, especially children, failed by lack of referral centres and experienced doctors

A study published in the latest issue of the Journal of Clinical Forensic Medicine examined the availability of Sexual Assault Referral Centres (SARCs) in the UK and compared their services with each other and with non-SARC police victim examination suites. A SARC is a model service established to address the forensic and therapeutic needs arising following sexual assault. more  

C-myc required by the immune system

C-myc, a gene commonly involved in cancer onset, has been found to have a role in the immune system's normal function according to a study published today in Blood. The surprising finding, by a Swiss research team led by investigators from the Lausanne Branch of the international Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR), showed that c-myc functions in the immune system's 'memory' of previous infections. more

Home testing kit could help identify 'hidden' caffeine in beverages 

If you’ve ever wondered whether your favorite coffee, tea or soda contains caffeine — despite its decaf label or the absence of caffeine on the ingredient list — then you may soon be able to test the beverage yourself. Chemists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are developing a quick, convenient "dipstick" test that they say could represent the first home testing kit to detect the common stimulant, which can cause insomnia and make you jittery. Their study will appear in the June 1 print issue of the American Chemical Society’s Analytical Chemistry. more

The higher the hierarchy, the greater the aggression  

Individual variation in social behavior is one of the most striking features of cooperative animal societies. In a new study from the June issue of American Naturalist, Michael A. Cant (University of Cambridge), Justine B. Llop (University of Cambridge), and Jeremy Field (University College London) investigate the extent to which differences in aggressive behavior within a cooperative society can be explained by "inheritance rank"--the likelihood that an individual will get to mate successfully in that society based on their rank--or place in the social hierarchy. They can only pass on their genes when they reach the top of the hierarchy, usually after those ahead of them in the rank have died and they have inherited the right to reproduce. more

Study finds most Americans have good vision, but 14 million are visually impaired

A National Institutes of Health (NIH) study has found that although 94 percent of Americans aged 12 and older have good vision, the remaining six percent, or 14 million, are visually impaired. Of these, more than 11 million have uncorrected visual impairment, such as nearsightedness. They need eyeglasses or contact lenses to improve their vision. Teenagers, people with diabetes, Hispanics, and people who are economically disadvantaged have higher rates of visual impairment and can most benefit from corrective lenses. This study is published in the May 10, 2006 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. more

 

A new home testing kit will allow home users to determine what's in that morning cup of java.